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Birth Interval

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Journal Article
Demography (1980) 17 (2): 207–223.
Published: 01 May 1980
...Henry I. Braun Abstract Employing a family of generalized linear models for the gamma distribution, the structure of birth interval data derived from three historical populations is examined. The relative importance of such factors as current age, parity of the mother, and duration of marriage...
Journal Article
Demography (1985) 22 (2): 145–168.
Published: 01 May 1985
...James Trussell; Linda G. Martin; Robert Feldman; James A. Palmore; Mercedes Concepcion; Datin Noor Laily Bt. Dato’ Abu Bakar 9 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1985 1985 Life Table Birth Order Birth Interval Conception Rate Fertility Survey References...
Journal Article
Demography (1986) 23 (1): 53–66.
Published: 01 February 1986
... relationships to fecundability within populations, the role offecundability as a proximate variable in models of the determinants of fertility requires further specification. 7 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1986 1986 Cohort Effect Birth Interval Marriage Cohort Coital Frequency...
Journal Article
Demography (1989) 26 (3): 439–450.
Published: 01 August 1989
...Robert D. Retherford; Minja Kim Choe; Shyam Thapa; Bhakta B. Gubhaju Abstract This article shows that in Nepal breastfeeding almost completely explains the effects of following birth interval on childhood mortality during the first 18 months of age and partially explains the effect of following...
Journal Article
Demography (1989) 26 (3): 425–437.
Published: 01 August 1989
...Kathleen Ford; Sandra L. Huffman; A. K. M. A. Chowdhury; Stan Becker; Hubert Allen; Jane Menken Abstract This article reports on the results of a study conducted in rural Bangladesh on the influence of maternal weight on the components of birth intervals, including gestation and intrauterine...
Journal Article
Demography (1999) 36 (4): 505–519.
Published: 01 November 1999
...Carl P. Schmertmann Abstract Censuses and surveys frequently collect information on period fertility through questions on the timing of last births. The standard approach to estimating fertility with open-interval data uses the proportion of women giving birth in the year before the interview. I...
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (1): 33–43.
Published: 01 February 1993
...Siân L. Curtis; Ian Diamond; John W. McDonald Abstract In this paper random-effects logistic models are used to analyze the effects of the preceding birth interval on postneonatal mortality in Brazil, controlling for the correlation of survival outcomes between siblings. The results are compared...
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (2): 175–188.
Published: 01 May 1993
...Tom Fricke; Jay D. Teachman Abstract Using data from a Nepali population, this analysis argues that marriage style and postmarital living arrangements affect coital frequency to produce variations in the timing of first birth after marriage. Event history analysis of the first birth interval...
Journal Article
Demography (1976) 13 (1): 45–64.
Published: 01 February 1976
...Che-Fu Lee; Kuang-Hua Lin Abstract A simplified model is presented for the measurement of inter-live birth interval distributions. Comparative analyses of “effective fecundability,” the mean length and variation of postpartum infecundity, and the parity progression ratio based on this measurement...
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Published: 01 October 2021
Fig. 4 Combined effects of prenatal and postnatal period and birth interval with younger sibling. The reference category is a birth interval of 2–29 months with previous sibling, perinatal period of 6 months after birth. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 2 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for rural women with no education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 3 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for rural women with 1–7 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 4 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for urban women with 1–7 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 5 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for rural women with 8–11 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 6 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for urban women with 8–11 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 7 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for urban women with 12 or more years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 8 Infant mortality by preceding birth interval length across periods for the second child of women with no education and women with 1–7 years of education. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 9 Infant mortality by preceding birth interval length across periods for the second child of women with 8–11 and 12 or more years of education. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 21 May 2018
Fig. 1 Birth interval (months) distribution in Sweden, 1938–1979 More
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Published: 03 July 2019
Fig. 3 Probability of dying before age 1 at different preceding birth interval lengths predicted by OLS and FE models. Error bars represent 95 % confidence intervals. More