1-20 of 679 Search Results for

Average Absolute Error

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Demography (2000) 37 (2): 193–201.
Published: 01 May 2000
...-R, a measure in the same scale as the original observations. We argue that MAPE-R is a more appropriate summary measure of average absolute percentage error when the guidelines indicate that MAPE is not valid. 12 1 2011 © Population Association of America 2000 2000 Root Mean Square...
Journal Article
Demography (2013) 50 (3): 827–852.
Published: 04 December 2012
..., and population sizes–gender structures at the subnational level in the United States. Comparisons of projections from 1990 to 2000 using this approach with census counts in 2000 for each of the 50 states and Washington, DC show that 68.0 %, 17.0 %, 11.2 %, and 3.8 % of the absolute percentage errors are <3.0...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1970) 7 (1): 87–91.
Published: 01 February 1970
... stratified along the lines recently suggested by Rosenberg; dummy variables were introduced to represent such county characteristics as region or rate of development; and stratification and dummy variables were combined in a single test. The average 1960 estimating error for the 55 counties was reduced from...
Journal Article
Demography (1980) 17 (3): 323–339.
Published: 01 August 1980
.... Special census results from Florida provide preliminary evidence that the new techniques produce more precise, less biased estimates than the other techniques. 8 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1980 1980 Housing Unit Occupancy Rate Vacancy Rate Average Absolute Error...
Image
Published: 28 January 2020
of algebraic errors for each method ( est – obs ). Panel k plots the distribution of absolute algebraic errors. Panel l plots the distribution of absolute percentage errors. For all variants, estimates are accurate over many scales and times. More
Journal Article
Demography (1976) 13 (2): 225–233.
Published: 01 May 1976
... the MAMC and MAMSP were derived. Such a pro- cedure yielded 2,704 observations of SMAM, MAMSP, MAMC, il, and the median. Over the entire range of observa- tions aexplained 99 and 97 percent of the variance in MAMC and SMAM respec- tively; the absolute value of the errors averaged, respectively, only .226...
Journal Article
Demography (1984) 21 (3): 383–404.
Published: 01 August 1984
... and average absolute errors for counties of 5 percent or less, they also note mean absolute percentage errors of over 23 percent for places under 500 population and errors of over 26 percent for places that had grown or declined by more than 10 percent in the past four to six years. Isserman (1977...
Journal Article
Demography (1987) 24 (4): 649–661.
Published: 01 November 1987
... populations. 654 DEMOGRAPHY, volume 24, number 4, November 1987 Labor Force Projections Table 1 summarizes the mean absolute percent errors, which are weighted by the total labor force of that area. Within each geographic area, the mean absolute percent error is the weighted average of the absolute percent...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (3): 443–453.
Published: 01 August 1972
...) procedure. Even one of the simple average formulas (formula 10) performed better than the multiple regression (ratio-correlation) procedure. The formulas in question do not compare the same way in terms of both mean square error and average per- cent absolute error, as can be easily seen from Table 1...
Journal Article
Demography (1983) 20 (3): 407–413.
Published: 01 August 1983
... in Table 1 and FLA-COM in Table 2 shows that estimates of PPH are more precise and more stable than estimates of house- holds. Average absolute percentage er- rors and standard deviations are smaller for FLA-COM than for FLA-REC in every size-of-place category. For the to- tal sample, the average error...
Journal Article
Demography (1988) 25 (3): 461–474.
Published: 01 August 1988
... Two measures were used to provide a general description of forecast error characteris- tics. Mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is the average percentage error when the direction of error is ignored. This provides a measure of forecast accuracy. Mean algebraic percentage error (MALPE...
Journal Article
Demography (2002) 39 (4): 697–712.
Published: 01 November 2002
... were calculated by comparing PPH estimates with the actual PPH values reported in the decennial census. We used two error measures to evaluate the esti- mates. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is the average error when the direc- tion of error is ignored. This is a measure of precision, or how...
Journal Article
Demography (1978) 15 (4): 549–557.
Published: 01 November 1978
.... As mentioned earlier, if mortality is declining, the Brass technique will overestimate current mor- tality levels. The table shows the average absolute percentage error of the Brass es- timates of q(2), q(3), and q(5) for various fertility schedules and various rates of mortality change. There are three main...
Journal Article
Demography (2003) 40 (4): 741–757.
Published: 01 November 2003
... measures of the accuracy of forecasts. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is the average when the direction of error is ignored. This is a measure of precision, or how close the projections were to census counts, regardless of whether they were too high or too low. The mean algebraic percentage...
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (4): 1559–1577.
Published: 05 July 2017
..., for remaining life expectancy at age 65. By contrast, many fewer observations are captured by the 95 % prediction intervals for lifespan disparity; empirical frequencies range from 0 % to 96.5 %, with the average being only approximately 26 %. Table 2 Mean of the absolute percentage errors (MAPE...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1978) 15 (2): 223–233.
Published: 01 May 1978
..., using averaging of simple regression estimates. This tech- nique yields a mean absolute error of only 4.1 percent, with about three-fourths of all estimates being within 5 percent of the census enumeration. The use of the NSMR and stratification by share of the population which is nonwhite yields aver...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (5): 1627–1650.
Published: 10 September 2015
... for all countries and producing posterior predictive distributions on the basis of the remaining (12− m ) time points. As point forecasts, we used the median of the posterior predictive distribution. We report out-of-sample mean absolute error as a measure of the quality of point forecasts, and interval...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1986) 23 (1): 105–126.
Published: 01 February 1986
... to the first 24 points of the series, forecasted 18 months ahead, and called the absolute value of the difference between the forecast and the corresponding observed value of the series the absolute forecast error. They then dropped the first point in the series, added the 25th point, re-estimated...
Journal Article
Demography (2018) 55 (4): 1547–1565.
Published: 03 July 2018
... . This finding is consistent with measurement error in the historical slave data, a downward bias in the OLS estimates due to omitted factors, or that the 2SLS estimates reflect a local average treatment effect. These estimates consistently suggest that areas with more prevalent slavery exhibit substantially...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (1): 221–241.
Published: 28 January 2020
... of algebraic errors for each method ( est – obs ). Panel k plots the distribution of absolute algebraic errors. Panel l plots the distribution of absolute percentage errors. For all variants, estimates are accurate over many scales and times. ...
FIGURES | View All (7)
Includes: Supplementary data