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Armed Force

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Published: 11 September 2012
Fig. 3 Share of white men serving in armed forces by year and quarter of birth. Sample includes all white, native-born men from the 1960–1980 1 % IPUMS samples More
Journal Article
Demography (1969) 6 (1): 13–16.
Published: 01 February 1969
...Ann R. Miller Abstract Movements of young men into and out of the armed forces and youth entering and leaving the college population are an important component of the migration between 1955 and 1960 recorded in the 1960 Census of the, United States. Measures of the migration behavior of persons...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (1): 268–305.
Published: 01 March 1968
..., p 2 and comprise a war term, w , that aids the growth-limiting process; a prosperity term, ∈ g′ , that inhibits the limiting process; and a culture term C , that supports the limiting process, too. The term, w , is taken to be proportional to the wartime size of the country's armed forces, assuming...
Journal Article
Demography (2000) 37 (3): 339–350.
Published: 01 August 2000
... for welfare magnets in the decision to return, but we learn that welfare participation leads to lower probability of return migration. Finally, we see no evidence of a skill bias in return migration, where skill is measured by performance on the Armed Forces Qualifying Test. 12 1 2011 © Population...
Journal Article
Demography (2011) 48 (2): 401–424.
Published: 04 May 2011
...Pratikshya Bohra-Mishra; Douglas S. Massey Abstract The existing literature on forced migration limits our understanding of how violence affects migration to competing destinations. This article adds to the literature on forced migration by studying how armed violence during a period of civil...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (4): 635–653.
Published: 01 November 1972
... are possibly due to the implementation of a more meaningful and rigorous methodology. 8 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1972 1972 Labor Force Labor Force Participation Armed Force Labor Force Participation Rate Supply Relationship References Baer, R. K. 1970a. Social...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (1): 79–85.
Published: 01 March 1968
... of retrospective migration rates in terms of migration propensities inapplicable. Employment status at the end of the one-year migration period can not be taken to indicate employment status prior to migration. 13 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1968 1968 Employment Status Armed Force...
Journal Article
Demography (1977) 14 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 February 1977
... has essentially been completed. 12 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1977 1977 Labor Force Participation Armed Force Return Migrant Recent Migration Labor Force Status References Eldridge , Hope T. , & Thomas , D. S. ( 1964 ). Demographic...
Journal Article
Demography (1984) 21 (4): 623–645.
Published: 01 November 1984
... in the definition of the nation's population. It pertains to the addition of Alaska and Hawaii as states in 1959 and the inclusion of their popula- tions in the national totals beginning in 1960. This discontinuity creates several subtle and tedious problems concerning the definition ofthe Armed Forces popu- lation...
Journal Article
Demography (2007) 44 (2): 389–404.
Published: 01 May 2007
... Using SAS . Cary, NC : SAS Institute . Bourg , M. , & Segal , M.W. ( 1999 ). The Impact of Family Supportive Policies and Practices on Organizational Commitment to the Army . Armed Forces & Society , 25 , 633 – 52 . 10.1177/0095327X9902500406 Bryant , R...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 19–29.
Published: 01 March 1967
... results appeared in No. 71, Out-of-School Youth. Two Years Later , by Vera C. Perrella and Elizabeth Waldman. These reports are referred to hereafter by number. The percentage in the Armed Forces is estimated by comparing the original sample size (No. 46, p. 1267) with the 1965 civilian noninstitutional...
Journal Article
Demography (1998) 35 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 May 1998
...-Time" 58.4 66.4 59.5 49.7 63.0 59.1 Percent in Armed Forces" 40.0 34.9 36.0 23.0 9.4 13.1 Percent Enrolled in School Full-Time" 10.8 3.2 19.9 12.3 25.0 15.2 Mean Education of Parents (Years) 8.5 6.8 10.6 9.5 12.3 10.9 Percent Lived in South at Age 16 23.1 75.8 23.6 59.5 23.4 48.6 aFar unmarried men...
Journal Article
Demography (1975) 12 (4): 601–614.
Published: 01 November 1975
..., the net out- migration at these ages can be attributed entirely to men leaving the military after serving tours of duty at Armed Forces installations in the South. Among men in the Armed Forces in 1965, the South's net migration was-58,OOO-about the same number as shown in Table 2 (data on migration...
Journal Article
Demography (2012) 49 (3): 841–855.
Published: 28 April 2012
.... , & Krueger A. B. ( 1994 ). Why do World War II veterans earn more than nonveterans? . Journal of Labor Economics , 12 , 74 – 97 . 10.1086/298344 Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center ( 2007 ). “Healthy deployers”: Nature and trends of health care utilization during the year prior...
Journal Article
Demography (1979) 16 (4): 535–547.
Published: 01 November 1979
... in the armed forces should elevate participation of wives, at least in the ab- sence of young children; but the booming civilian economy should depress partici- pation on the part of other wives whose husbands' incomes are rising (pp. 344- 345). Moreover, Lebergott (p. 347) identi- fies consumer credit...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 941–946.
Published: 01 June 1968
... on the use of condoms were the widespread educational activities in the Armed Forces during World War II aimed at the pre- vention of disease. The United States and other Armed Forces issued free condoms to their troops. This free supply created a demand for products from the manu- facturer that had never...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (1): 143–157.
Published: 01 February 1972
... marital discord. This status includes wives of men in the armed forces, of men in in- stitutions, and of men who are living in another locality in connection with their employment. With the data available in the census we cannot identify the rea- son that a woman is MSA-O. We do know from 1960 Current...
Journal Article
Demography (1973) 10 (4): 517–524.
Published: 01 November 1973
... with an armed force of 225,000, but its population policy is defi- nitely not antinatalist; and Trinidad and Tobago, while having very little power (about 1,000 armed forces personnel), supports family planning. There is reason to believe that differ- ent statistical results might be obtained from separate...
Journal Article
Demography (1964) 1 (1): 186–193.
Published: 01 March 1964
... illustrative theoretical distri- butions and empirical examples are pre- sented in Table 1. Obviously, none of the theoretical extremes are found in the SMSA's under consideration. The values of T ranged from .23 to .83, and it is only when we examine the daily movement of members of the Armed Forces...
Journal Article
Demography (1976) 13 (4): 565–570.
Published: 01 November 1976
... or in the armed forces in 1965 were classified as employed; those who did not have a job were classi- fied as nonemployed. For the 1970 data, the employed population includes those who were at work, holding jobs but not at work, and those in the armed forces, whereas unemployed persons and those not in the labor...