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Age at arrival

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Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (1): 201–229.
Published: 04 January 2017
...Are Skeie Hermansen Abstract This study examines the causal relationship between childhood immigrants’ age at arrival and their life chances as adults. I analyze panel data on siblings from Norwegian administrative registries, which enables me to disentangle the effect of age at arrival on adult...
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Published: 07 March 2015
Fig. 1 Age at arrival and English language proficiency. The sample consists of age at arrival 0–17, living in Australia 11–55 years, and currently aged 25–55 More
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Published: 04 January 2017
Fig. 1 Adult socioeconomic outcomes by age at arrival among childhood immigrants. The point estimates in each panel refer to the estimated difference in adult socioeconomic outcomes between immigrant-background children born in Norway (indicated by the horizontal solid bar at 0) and childhood More
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Published: 04 January 2017
Fig. 2 Adult labor market outcomes by age at arrival among childhood immigrants before and after controlling for completed education. The point estimates in each panel refer to the estimated difference in adult labor market outcomes between immigrant-background children born in Norway (indicated More
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (2): 571–602.
Published: 17 March 2017
...Marigee Bacolod; Marcos A. Rangel Abstract We study the economic assimilation of childhood immigrants to the United States. The linguistic distance between English and the predominant language in one’s country of birth interacted with age at arrival is shown to be closely connected to occupational...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2008) 45 (3): 619–639.
Published: 01 August 2008
... and generally receive similar returns to years of schooling completed. Immigrants also receive substantial returns to acculturation, measured as age at arrival and English language skill. These results cast doubt on the strong version of segmented labor market theory, in which low-skill immigrants...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (5): 1513–1542.
Published: 25 August 2015
..., race, age at arrival in the United States, and human capital. For example, controlling a rich set of human capital and demographic characteristics, some migrants—such as those from South Africa/Zimbabwe and Cape Verde, who typically enter on employment visas—earn substantial premiums relative to other...
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Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (5): 1655–1681.
Published: 01 October 2022
... to the challenge of distilling the duration effect from the confounding cohort-of-arrival and age-of-arrival effects. Because longitudinal studies tend to use self-rated health as the outcome, the changes they observed may reflect shifts in immigrants' awareness of health problems. We illuminate the debate...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2012) 49 (2): 651–675.
Published: 14 February 2012
... an ethnic group by nativity status. Ethnic endogamy is strong and, to a lesser extent, so is panethnic endogamy. Yet, marital or cohabiting unions with whites remain an important path of integration but differ significantly by ethnicity, nativity, age at arrival, and educational attainment. Meanwhile...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (4): 1295–1320.
Published: 26 June 2015
... as a potentially significant deviation from this paradox for second-generation immigrant children. We evaluated two alternate measures of mother’s acculturation: age at arrival in the United States and English language proficiency. To obtain sufficient numbers of second-generation immigrant children, we pooled...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (2): 513–542.
Published: 07 March 2015
...Fig. 1 Age at arrival and English language proficiency. The sample consists of age at arrival 0–17, living in Australia 11–55 years, and currently aged 25–55 ...
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Journal Article
Demography (1966) 3 (2): 352–377.
Published: 01 June 1966
... there were three female migrants. Migration was also selective by age. During the decade preceding the survey, two-thirds had arrived before attaining their twenty-fifth birthday. Forty-four percent of the men and 51 percent of the women had been between 15 and 29 years of age at time of arrival...
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (3): 975–985.
Published: 01 June 2021
... and 30 on June 15, 2012; (3) arrived in the United States before June 15, 2007, at the age of 16 or younger; (4) had completed high school or a GED, were enrolled in school, or were active military or honorably discharged veterans; and (5) had not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor...
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Includes: Supplementary data
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Published: 01 December 2021
Fig. 3 Age at first birth by immigrant background (second generation or age at arrival for child migrants), relative to ancestral Swedes. Models control for birth cohort. Dashed red lines indicate that age at first birth was 25.9 for equivalent ancestral Swedes. Source: Authors' analysis based More
Journal Article
Demography (2001) 38 (3): 317–336.
Published: 01 August 2001
... with the POB/YOA categories. For Mexicans, enrollment rates clearly increase with a younger age at arrival in the United States. The problem of nonenrollment is particularly acute for those who arrived from 1987 to 1990. This pattern is attenuated when covari- ates are added to the model (compare Model 5...
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (4): 1109–1134.
Published: 06 July 2016
... and economic development, and immigrants have arrived with distinct distributions of socioeconomic status, visa type, year of immigration, and age at immigration. We use high-quality linked Social Security and Medicare records to estimate life tables for the older U.S. population over the full range of birth...
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Journal Article
Demography (2007) 44 (2): 225–249.
Published: 01 May 2007
... Americans living in the United States. Among U.S. residents, we identify the following groups: U.S.-born Mexican Americans, Mexican-born who arrived in the United States as children younger than 12 (the 1.5 Generation and Mexican-born who arrived at age 12 or older (the 1.0 Generation For the 1.0...
Journal Article
Demography (1992) 29 (4): 613–626.
Published: 01 November 1992
... = - ' < O ce an ia 2. 4 1. 5 0. 6 0. 0 1. 0 0. 6 ~ N or th A m er ic a 20 .0 20 .9 39 .5 1. 6 29 .0 30 .0 ~ Ca na da 2. 8 5. 3 1. 7 0. 0 2. 3 2. 0 ~ M ex ic o 6. 8 5. 7 15 .2 0. 0 10 .6 10 .6 0 Ca rib be an 7. 7 6. 3 17 .0 . 1. 5 11 .9 13 .1 ~ D om in ic an Re pu bl ic 0. 7 1. 6 6. 4 0. 0 3. 9 4. 2 Ja m ai ca 1.1 1. 7 4. 9 0. 0 3. 2 3. 5 Ce nt ra lA m er ic a 2. 6 3. 5 5. 6 0. 1 4. 2 4. 3 'l' So ut h A m er ic a 8. 8 9. 2 7. 8 0. 0 7. 4 6. 5 ~ Co lo m bi a 1. 6 2. 0 2. 2 0. 0 1. 8 1. 8 a N ot e: To ta ls in cl ud e u n kn ow n an d u n re po rte d co u n tr y o fo rig in . ~ ~ Immigration to the United States 619 smaller effects on future immigration-in terms of the proportion who petition for relatives or who have children in the United States-than would be concluded from INS data. The second portion of Table 1 shows variations in the regional composition of each component of long-term immigration. Europeans and Asians each comprise nearly one-third of nonimmigrants staying one year or more; two-fifths of nonimmigrant adjustments (which exclude refugees) are Asian. Published INS data show that nearly one-half of the volume of immigration in 1983 originated in Asia. The recompiled estimates of long-term immigration suggest a somewhat lower proportion of Asian immigration and a slightly higher share of immigration from Europe. These results have significant implications for the program of population estimates and projections of the US Census Bureau, which uses INS data to derive estimates of U.S. population growth and racial composition. The UN measure of long-term immigration suggests a different pattern of geographic origin and possibly different social and cultural impacts of immigration in comparison to current INS statistics. These results raise several issues for the analysis of US immigration policy. For example, significant levels of (long-term) nonimmigrant migration have not been taken into account in developing US immigration policy to limit the number of immigrants admitted each year. More critical for policy analysts, however, is how accurately the two measures of immigration reflect the actual patterns of immigration to the United States and thus direct the analysis of the impacts of immigration. That is, the estimates of long-term immigration guide research on the social and economic impacts of immigration in different directions from published results. Long-term immigration from Japan and from many European countries, for example, is much higher than the level shown in INS data and suggests a potentially larger economic effect in the United States. Because the higher level of immigration from these areas reflects a large number of nonimmigrants who stay more than one year and depart, the social demographic effect of immigration on local communities will likely be different from that of other immigration flows. ' Comparisons between the measures of immigration for age characteristics and for state of intended residence are presented respectively in Tables 2 and 3. Not surprisingly, Table 2 reveals higher proportions of long-term nonimmigrants in the working-age groups and higher proportions of children among new immigrant arrivals, As shown in the two right-hand columns of Table 2, the overall age composition of estimated long-term immigration is quite similar to that of data on INS admissions, but we find large relative Table 2. Alien Immigration to the United States, by Age Groups: Calendar Year 1983 Estimated Long-Term Immigration Nonimmigrarifs New INS Departures Adjust- Immigrant Refugee Immigrant Age >1 year ments Arrivals Arrivals Total Admissions Percentages All Ages 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 (119,758) (96,481) (339,184) (62,905) (618,328) (552,496) <15 16.5 11.8 23.6 31.7 21.2 21.6 15-24 14.7 27.9 25.0 24.5 23.4 24.4 25-34 28.4 34.4 25.2 22.0 26.9 27.7 35-44 19.8 11.6 11.3 11.1 13.0...
Journal Article
Demography (2006) 43 (2): 361–382.
Published: 01 May 2006
..., we also generate estimates by age, sex, region of birth, and duration of residence in the United States. 14 6 2012 © Population Association of America 2006 2006 Current Population Survey Emigration Rate Recent Arrival Return Immigration March Current Population Survey...
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Published: 01 December 2021
Fig. 2 Completed fertility by immigrant background (second generation or age at arrival for child migrants), relative to ancestral Swedes. Models control for birth cohort. Dashed red lines indicate that completed fertility was 1.99 for equivalent ancestral Swedes. Source: Authors' analysis based More