Summary

This paper uses in-migration, out-migration, and net migration vectors to measure and portray the migration streams occurring between April 1, 1955, and April 1, 1960, for all persons five years old and over on April 1, 1960, among 38 contiguous state economic areas (SEA’s) in Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, and New Mexico. Both rectangular and polar coordinates were employed in computing three different types of vector representations. First, migration vectors for each SEA, expressed in total people-miles of in-movement, out-movement, and net movement represent the resultant direction of movement and the total people-miles of movement. Second, in- and out-migration vectors of the total people-miles of movement, with the widths of the vectors drawn proportional to the number of migrants, show the total size of each migration stream for each SEA, the resultant direction of movement, and the distance moved in total people-miles of movement. Third, in- and out-migration vectors of the average distances moved to and from each SEA, with the widths of the vectors drawn proportional to the number of migrants, show the magnitude of movement, the average distance moved per migrant, and the resultant direction of movement.

This study shows that migration vectors based upon polar coordinates are more accurate than the migration vectors based upon rectangular coordinates. Also, the in- and out-migration vectors are superior to net migration vectors in representing migratory streams among geographic areas.

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Resumen

Este trabajo emplea los vectores de immigración, emmigración, y migración neta para medir e identificar las corrientes migratorias que ocurrieron entre el l°. de abril de 1955 y el l°. de abril de 1960, para todas las personas que tenían cinco o más años de edad al lo. de abril de 1960, entre 38 áreas económicas estatales (SEA’s) en Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas y Nuevo México. Se emplearon coordinadas rectangulares y polares para computar tres tipos de representaciones vectoriales. Primer-o, vectores de migración para cada SEA, expresados en total de millas-personas de movimiento hacia el lugar, movimiento fuera del lugar, y movimiento neto, representan la resultante dirección de desplazamiento y el total de millas-personas de movimiento. Segundo, los vectores de immigración í emigration del total de millas-personas de movimiento, con el ancho de los vectores proportional al número de migrantes, muestran la magnitud total de coda corriente migratoria para cada SEA, la resultante dirección del movimiento, y la distancia desplazada en total del personas-millas de movimiento. Tercero, los vectores de inmigración y emigración para las distancias promedio de desplazamiento hacia y desde cada SEA, con el ancho de los vectores proportional al número de migrantes, mostrando la magnitud de desplazamientos, la distancia promedio de movimiento por migrante, y la resultante dirección de movimiento.

Este estudio muestra que los vectores de migration basados en coordinadas polares son más exactes que los vectores de migración basados en coordinadas rectangulares. Asi mismo, los vectores de inmigración son superiores a los vectores de migración neta en la representación de corrientes migratorias entre áreas geogrdficas.

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References

1
See, for example, Russell B. Adams, Population Mobility in the Upper Midwest (“Upper Midwest Economic Study,” Urban Report No. 6 [Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1964]); Hope T. Eldridge, “Streams of Migra tion,” in Hope T. Eldridge and Dorothy Swaine Thomas, Population Redistribution and Economic Growth, United States 1870–1950, Vol. III: Demographic Analyses and Interrelations (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1964), pp. 108–30; Carter Goodrich et al., Migration and Economic Opportunity (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1936), Appendix A; Calvin F. Schmid and John Manzer Griswold, “Migration within the State of Washington, 1935–40,” American Sociological Review, XVII (1952), 312–26; Henry S. Shryock, Jr., Population Mobility within the United States (Chicago: Community and Family Study Center, 1964), chap. viii, and C. Warren Thornthwaite, Internal Migration in the United States (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1934).
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