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reality television

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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2011) 7 (3): 391–408.
Published: 01 November 2011
... PRINTED IN THE UK 2011 integral reality Second Life virtual reality reality simulation reality television MMORPG Second Life is a virtual world. No, Second Life is a 3D online digital world imagined, created, and owned by its residents. But hang on – there's more: analysts often describe...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2010) 6 (1): 49–64.
Published: 01 March 2010
... does not mean that its considerable diversity can be ignored. A cursory glance through the prime-time television schedules, for instance, reveals how one might choose between shows featuring celebrity hosts and guests, contest-based reality television shows that participate in the construction...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2015) 11 (3): 407–411.
Published: 01 November 2015
... to recent reality TV shows, starting with I Was Impaled and 1000 Ways to Die . According to Foster, these shows appropriate tropes from horror films, but unlike those films, the shows lack a clearly defined narrative structure and well-defined heroes and villains, hence they lack “any moral complexity...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2014) 10 (1): 105–119.
Published: 01 March 2014
... 2014 postfeminism Baudrillard makeover reality television simulation The cultural rhetoric of postfeminism has become a pervasive feature of gender identities and relations in the contemporary West. It has been critiqued by Angela McRobbie as a “kind of anti-feminism, which is reliant...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2019) 15 (2): 252–255.
Published: 01 July 2019
... in mainstream political rhetoric as much as it is in reality television, Littler shows how it has found its representation in a diverse range of actors—from the idealized workers of Silicon Valley’s “new tech” economy and “salt of the earth” billionaires, to “rags to riches” reality TV winners. The book...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2018) 14 (3): 413–415.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... Forkert’s media background (she currently works as reader in the School of Media at Birmingham City University) comes through in the chapter about reality TV and “poverty porn” and how she engages with media discourses in an attempt to unpack and unpick dominant narratives and attitudes. While the arguments...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2006) 2 (2): 213–224.
Published: 01 July 2006
... someone else – a real victory for imaginary stakes. The only original screen genre of the early twenty-first century is not called “reality TV” for nothing. Sure, reality TV doesn’t look like reality, but then neither does reality. Both look like games. Both become a seamless space in which gamers test...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2008) 4 (2): 222–230.
Published: 01 July 2008
... attention it confers have resorted to elaborate stunts that, more than anything, bring to mind the HBO series Jackass . Largely invented by MTV, the “Reality TV” genre “lets you get so close to celebrities [that] you can almost smell their armpits,” as Sharon Osbourne put it on MTV’s The Osbournes...
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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2014) 10 (1): 40–61.
Published: 01 March 2014
... be directly experienced ( Leonelli 2007 : 144–45). The success of reality television attests to this inversion as do the plethora of novels imagining presidential, vice presidential, or first lady lives, or autofiction. This implies a different temporality—neither past nor future, but the cold ludic...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2010) 6 (2): 171–180.
Published: 01 July 2010
.... This is why there is no need to create political reality TV programs, as proposed by a representative of the Raffarin government: they already exist. 4. In the same way, in fact, as service societies short-circuit the social processes of transindividuation, as I have attempted to show in Réenchanter...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2010) 6 (1): 65–84.
Published: 01 March 2010
... cam-based websites was a major impetus behind the emergence of the global television franchise Big Brother (Endemol for Channel 4 2000–). Reality television, the great television phenomenon of the last decade, combines elements of soap opera, the fly–on-the wall documentary, Internet web-cams...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2012) 8 (1): 61–72.
Published: 01 March 2012
... me remind you of what a young man said on a reality TV show. He was asked what he wanted to do in the future. His response was: “I want to do celebrity.” He didn't want to become a Picasso, a Shakespeare, or a Godard. He wanted to “do celebrity.” And he had perfectly understood that celebration would...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2010) 6 (1): 111–124.
Published: 01 March 2010
... genre of reality television, namely lifestyle. Whilst this style of programming flourished under the ideology of neo-liberalism, under current economic conditions their existing form and function have become problematic. We would argue that the genre and its presenters are worthy of study as they both...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 102–113.
Published: 01 March 2021
... powerful state, headed by a reality-TV president with little ideology other than to stay in power, who allowed the virus to feed on complacency and disinformation as panic ensued, lives were lost, and the economy wrecked? How did an inanimate, spectral sequence of genetic code become the most powerful...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2019) 15 (1): 29–47.
Published: 01 March 2019
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2012) 8 (1): 97–119.
Published: 01 March 2012
...) and Double Feature Films. The author of Guerrilla Television had become a key player in “the beast.” Boyle gives several reasons for TVTV's failure (1997: 190–208). She sees it as following the broader failure of the counterculture and its ideals and institutions when faced with reality and the more...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2017) 13 (2): 135–149.
Published: 01 July 2017
... into the day, followed by his rallies and often outrageous statements. Hence, although Trump attacked the “lying media” in every stump speech, he was enabled and empowered by the mainstream broadcast media from the beginning of his campaign, which made it a popular reality TV show. Trump also mucked about...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2005) 1 (1): 51–74.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Pantic, Richard Rogers and Auke Towslager. 1. A thorough historical analysis of the contribution would spell out the steps involved in the uncoupling of messages from responses. Such an analysis would draw out the ways that responses to the broadly cast messages of television programs were...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2017) 13 (1): 58–80.
Published: 01 March 2017
... and sexual performance via social media (and in the wake of the use of the Internet for distribution of celebrity sex tapes), and the genres of reality television. Richardson’s adoption of amateur pornography aesthetics across the 2000s begins to signal a way beyond the limitations of the consumerist...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2007) 3 (2): 175–202.
Published: 01 July 2007
...; everyone knows what it means; everyone identifies with its power. The rich and the famous, the celebrities on reality TV shows, and the politicians – at least of the left – are comfortable with the Red Ribbon as it focuses attention on those with the disease in a manner to de-stigmatize it by stressing...