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polling technology

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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 71–94.
Published: 01 March 2007
...Bob Hanke This essay develops a technocultural studies approach to political elections and polling. First, I shift our attention from polling as a cultural form to developments in polling technology that are transfiguring this form. I then examine the production and circulation of political opinion...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 51–74.
Published: 01 March 2005
...Jodi Dean What is the political impact of networked communications technologies? I argue that as communicative capitalism they are profoundly depoliticizing. The argument, first, conceptualizes the current political-economic formation as one of communicative capitalism. It then moves to emphasize...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 75–100.
Published: 01 March 2005
... local. We end by noting the relevance of the ideas of Guy Debord, with his focus on the construction of situations, the use of technology, media of communication and cultural forms to promote a revolution of everyday life. © BERG 2005 PRINTED IN THE UK 2005 It has been just over a decade since the...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 23–34.
Published: 01 March 2007
... 2000a : 3; Virilio 2000 : 44–5), Bob Hanke directs Virilio's recent meditations on new media and information technologies toward the highly revealing case of Canadian electoral politics. Hanke's “Media Poll-itics in Canadian Elections: A Report on Accelerated Public Opinion” focuses attention on the...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 339–344.
Published: 01 November 2011
... “Beaubourg effect”! It was an affair of state when – through sacralizing the art object and the gallery where you commune with it – the aim was to cultivate “the masses,” that new “silent majority,” a vague, elusive entity that was beginning to appear with the first opinion polls and the books that were...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 135–149.
Published: 01 July 2017
... Hillary Clinton was going to win, as she was three to six points ahead in the national polls, and predictions appeared across the board indicating victory. Her campaign camp was cheerful and optimistic, gathered in a ballroom of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center where her supporters were packed in and...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 193–214.
Published: 01 July 2005
..., bartered, stolen or given, the object must somehow arrive. Production, centered on craft and technologies that embed older craft, and audiencing, grounded in recognizing and making meaning, only appear as political-economic activities when seen from the point of view of distribution. The projected purchase...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2018
... the daguerreotype. What the technological reproducibility of the image instituted in modernism was a formal criterion to “make it new!” From impressionism onward, through cubism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism, visual art sought to distance itself formally from the production of verisimilitude...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 53–69.
Published: 01 March 2015
... scandals. 5 During this era, media spectacle emerged as a dominant form in which news and information, politics, war, entertainment, sports, and scandals were presented to the public in the United States, and then globally, circulating through the matrix of old and new media and technologies. 6 By...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 299–318.
Published: 01 November 2006
... Business Week bluntly referred to the “New Economy” of the 1990s as “the rise of risk capital” (quoted in Hutton 2003b : 122). New forms of technology quantify that risk, from earthquake modeling to actuarial estimates and share-price responses ( Smutniak 2004 ). Rather than being occasional, risk is now...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 257–278.
Published: 01 November 2005
... legitimation crisis ( Habermas 1976 ) that haunts the contemporary state. This specter of legitimation crisis manifests itself in the withdrawal of trust and support for political parties and institutions and erosion of the motivational basis of the democratic electoral system resulting in low poll turnouts...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 29–48.
Published: 01 March 2006
... seclusion was rapidly, violently breaking down. Academic, journalistic, and intelligence reports uniformly depicted an Asia in social ferment, its traditional cultural bonds ruptured by the infiltration of modern ideas and technology. A 1950 CIA report noted “the particular susceptibility [to Communism] of...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 15–28.
Published: 01 March 2019
... could be used as a deregulated site for corporate exploitation and as a tax haven. The men in the lift are united by a drive to supremacism. They seek to bolster their own financial and social power through a range of financial, cultural, and technological strategies—including lying—while repeatedly...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 103–132.
Published: 01 March 2011
... economic formations more generally ( Innis 1950 ). By “communication,” we refer to the exchange and construction of meanings and value between people, including the practical means by which meanings are transported and mobilized through space and time. These processes are by definition technological...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2014) 10 (1): 40–61.
Published: 01 March 2014
... drugs of electronic games” in which one plays with one’s laptop or smartphone or iPad “with the same somnambular absence and tactile euphoria.” What he articulated so presciently was both the ludic and the operational aspects of new informational technologies, which can be read as a herald for the...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 409–430.
Published: 01 November 2011
... pose and answer their own questions, he thinks, “via the simulated detour of a response” (1981: 171) such as a poll or referendum. Likewise, the consumer “takes and makes use of” but does not give, reimburse, and exchange reciprocally. A functional object does not require a response, Baudrillard...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 173–189.
Published: 01 July 2016