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libidinal drive

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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 158–169.
Published: 01 July 2013
... Five Car Stud , suggesting that attention to this aspect of Lyotard's writings might allow us to avoid some of the impasses created by the emphasis upon the sublime aspect of aesthetic experience. Reading Pacific Wall in terms of the problems set out in Lyotard's Libidinal Economy , I contend that one...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 465–488.
Published: 01 November 2012
... the shops. This speaks loudly of the current condition of subjectivity in a postpolitical era dominated by neoliberalism and liberal postmodernism. © 2012 Duke University Press 2012 urban riots consumer culture postpolitics libidinal drive subjectivity In August 2011 “riots” erupted...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 181–199.
Published: 01 July 2010
... philosophy to the Marxist analysis of capitalism, underpinned by Freudian libidinal economy. I argue that the originality of Stiegler's work lies in his understanding of retentional finitude: what he calls “tertiary memory.” This understanding provides him with critical purchase on contemporary capitalist...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 170–187.
Published: 01 July 2013
... this “libidinal displaceability” in the death drive. Freeing the primary processes from the negativity of lack would enable us to experience events in all their unique haeccity, without making them objects for knowledge: forestalling the re-presentation of presence. Yet despite the absence of an...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 233–237.
Published: 01 July 2013
... role of desire with respect to figure and to discourse. Whereas as Bamford explains, “The figural [is a] desire powered by the non-signifying ‘unbound’ forces of the death drive” (47) and is thus related to the “polymorphic perversity” of infantile sexuality, libidinal setups that allow for a...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 115–126.
Published: 01 March 2006
... emergence of a new modality of spectacle. It is characterized by a shift toward real-time engagements and continuous, heightened states of alertness and preparedness, in such a way as to generate a state of extreme readiness for both conflict and libidinous consumption. It blends combat and commodity, and...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 144–157.
Published: 01 July 2013
... relation between discourse and figure is one of a differend because there is no common code to mediate between the structural discontinuity characterizing discourses and the libidinal relation that drives a subject to the desired object and that motivated its visual presentation. There is an...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 157–170.
Published: 01 July 2010
... rethink forms of economic and political organizations as libidinal economies, but by way of technologies – which are always technologies of the mind – and which, being technologies of the mind, enable sublimation to be produced, and drives to be transformed into desire. This is a radical revolution...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 296–300.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Lyotard’s Libidinal Economy (1974), and Jean Baudrillard’s Symbolic Exchange and Death (1976). For Noys, in these texts the French philosophers argue in different ways that in the aftermath of 1968, to bring capitalism to an end the political strategy to adopt is to intensify capital, to...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 193–206.
Published: 01 July 2012
... writing project, comes to stand in for some kind of limit case to world amplification and border crossing into subliminal, libidinal, transgressive, or subterranean spaces of otherness. Kerouac threatens to come undone by his own recurring trope of “fellaheen” primitive universality—the fallacious...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 202–216.
Published: 01 July 2016
... article does signify a type of libidinal and sexual desire in a way that often articulates race and sexuality when deployed by jazz promoters and by the FBI agents that monitored them. This intersectional emphasis on queerness and heteronationalism marks the contribution to be made by historicizing...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 182–193.
Published: 01 July 2014
... a dystopia that co-opts willing followers through the manipulation of libidinal, corporeal energy. In this respect, the forms of power in Huxley’s dystopia are similar to Michel Foucault’s (1977) notion of biopower, which controls through the manipulation of the body that feels, and Bernard...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 5–26.
Published: 01 March 2009
... more dangerous not to acknowledge this irreducible antagonism, as this lack of acknowledgement leads to negative forms of conflict in the arenas of both domestic and international politics. Mouffe explains by referring to the various affective forces, which she calls “‘passions’”: i.e. those drives...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 257–278.
Published: 01 November 2005
.... They can be capricious, equivocal, ambivalent, playful, and malicious. They are prone to human weaknesses and impulses, such as lust, envy, anger, and cruelty. Trickster embodies life forces that are ungoverned and ungovernable. He has unquenchable appetites, drives, and desires – excesses of human...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 177–193.
Published: 01 July 2017
... kind of sexual gratification he promises to one woman he managed to seduce: “I could drive you wild. I’m tireless. I’m ready to conquer the world. I’m a character from 1001 Nights .” 7 Roufa may still be able to deliver on these promises, but the film focuses on his breakdown and crisis. When he...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 371–390.
Published: 01 November 2011
... susceptible of cathexis by a libidinal instrumentality” so that it becomes “a substitute for the phallus” (1996 [1968]: 117). A technical object can become a fetish for colonized tribal people where it becomes a sign of colonial power (1996 [1968]: 82, 117). These passing references are rethought in an essay...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2019) 15 (2): 184–201.
Published: 01 July 2019
... seen him in a few months, and would love to see him again” (452). In less than ten minutes, Mercer is located driving somewhere, but he is not interested in “communication.” Mae talks to Mercer through the Circle’s drone: “‘Mercer!’ she said, in mock-authoritative voice. ‘Mercer, stop the car and...