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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 80–91.
Published: 01 March 2021
..., an application developed by the Ministry of Health and Government Technology Agency, circumvents the use of geolocation tracking: formulating a network of infected bodies using proximity data, the population undergoes a topological change. Drawing on a tradition that acknowledges the transformative quality...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 92–101.
Published: 01 March 2021
...Chris Hables Gray Abstract To understand 2020’s pandemic is to see virus as a language we can use. By drawing on viral principles—viruses are infections through information, viruses can be understood only through percentages and exponentials, and viruses are zombies from outer space—the dynamics...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2006) 2 (1): 77–96.
Published: 01 March 2006
... on the voluntrism of the entire population. In this sense, during its course, the epidemic produced a “national” community that the long-ruling single-party state government had been skeptical to affirm. The end of the epidemic became a moment of affirmation of the nation as community. Nevertheless, once infected...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2007) 3 (2): 175–202.
Published: 01 July 2007
... those who are infected rather than on the means of infection. But even politicians of the right now advocate at least some of the goals emblematic in the Red Ribbon. And as a result a greater number of diseases have picked up the politics of representation in seeing the Ribbon as signifying a public...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 114–123.
Published: 01 March 2021
... existential conditions into a kind of homesickness for a world before the world of the coronavirus engulfed us, into a mirage, or into a sort of optical illusion wherein terms such as infection and virus , species , and bats are not quite so prevalent in our everyday lexicon. Why? Because, faced...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 55–68.
Published: 01 March 2021
... of the accidents and chaos of a pandemic. But we need to be careful with how we grasp what kind of chaos this is and not mistake complexity with a lack of logic or organization. Despite the unfolding complications of a loop, clearly, the modeling of an epidemic, and the descriptive rendering of an infection rate...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 17–27.
Published: 01 March 2021
... to visit their families for the lunar holiday. As the still developing narrative stands in June 2020 (as I write), it seems that the first cases of coronavirus infection probably occurred in Wuhan in December 2019 (or possibly, earlier that autumn). However, the city wasn't locked down until January 23...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 145–149.
Published: 01 March 2021
..., and fauna; and unapologetically leaving our indelible carbon footprints at a deep geological scale in the wake of our so-called progress or civilization. Of course, we seek medical intervention when something makes us sick, especially so in the case of viral infections. But when the vaccine is not readily...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2013) 9 (1): 22–41.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., and Latino bodies) were considered potential health threats to the American nation through their supposedly infected blood ( Shah 2001: 197–99 ). Mandatory screening was understood to be able to detect hidden disease lurking in this blood, rendering it visible and knowable as a selective basis of exclusion...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 28–36.
Published: 01 March 2021
... . Fortin Jacey , and Andreoni Manuela . 2020 . “ U.S. Caseload Surpasses 5 Million, Leading World .” New York Times , August 9 . Foster Robin , and Mundell E. J. 2020 . “ As Schools Reopen, Report Shows Ninety-Seven Thousand U.S. Kids Infected with COVID in Late July .” U.S...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 124–134.
Published: 01 March 2021
... that the virus is a modernizing force by virtue of its ability to spread and keep moving forward by infecting more and more people. Caught between the nihilistic sublife of the virus and the nihilistic techno will to will of global capitalism, Žižek ( 2020 ) thinks that humanity can make an existential choice...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 1–10.
Published: 01 March 2021
... and cultural contagion and approaches to understanding the unreason of collective behavior. Quite apart from leaving the minority of people it infects struggling to breathe, the coronavirus, as Levy tells us, is a highly contagious “panic virus” that we must come to terms with socially, psychologically...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2009) 5 (3): 385–389.
Published: 01 November 2009
... that this was an infection that had provoked a fervor that could not be understood merely as a desire for change, but as a certain sort of cold frenzy. For Featherstone, the explanation for the origin of the virus is the sheer radicality of the utopian's ambition. Opening the “possibility of possibility” is like staring...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2018) 14 (1): 40–50.
Published: 01 March 2018
... module as a mixture of appropriated and hand-painted elements, I used painting to create a dialogue between biological and technological modes of reproduction in my I.D. Series . As with my earlier works, I wanted to infect high modernism, adding social content related to questions of the body...
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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 135–144.
Published: 01 March 2021
... inactivity, enforced unemployment, impatient frustration, or bewildered incomprehension. Waiting has also, in some contexts, become a kind of decency—to protect others, to reduce pressure on essential services, to stop the spread of infection. This is not Shute's version of waiting, which is waiting...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 37–47.
Published: 01 March 2021
... Uli , and Ginn Franklin . 2016 . “ Immunity, Infectivity, and Awkward Flourishing in the Plantationocene .” Paper presented at Encounters with Deep Time: Violence , University of Edinburgh , February 22–23 . www.environmentalhumanities.ed.ac.uk/beisel-ginn/ . Biehler Dawn Day...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2011) 7 (3): 339–344.
Published: 01 November 2011
... it can be seen as the ultimate power of evil. The problem is that, nowadays, the evil is largely virtual. A good example of this is Iraq, where the weapons of mass destruction have, after all, never been found. The worst thing is that, by claiming to fight this evil, centers of infection get created all...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2010) 6 (3): 383–388.
Published: 01 November 2010
... protecting readers from possible sources of infection. Like Bruce Sterling's preface to the recent republication of Jünger's highly recommended and uncannily prescient novel The Glass Bees ( Jünger 2000 ), it shows that claims for the ongoing relevance of Jünger's texts can be as interesting as the texts...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2021) 17 (1): 102–113.
Published: 01 March 2021
... zombie event? Outside the decorum of official as well as academic discourse, the question leads to others. How did a string of self-replicating RNA find such a perfect state of symbiosis, infecting and slowing but never quite killing the global economy? How did the virus find the perfect host in the most...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (2007) 3 (1): 51–70.
Published: 01 March 2007
... and, at the end of Part Two of Atonement , reaches the beach at Dunkirk. Though delirious from hunger and from an infected wound, as he slips into unconsciousness at the end of the section he is heartened by the news that he and his comrades will be evacuated the following morning. The reader's hopes...