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corporate social responsibility

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Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 54–65.
Published: 01 March 2016
... rewarding oneself. © 2016 Duke University Press 2016 app iPhone corporate social responsibility Starbucks time When some refer to Starbucks’ coffee as an affordable luxury, I think to myself, Maybe so . But more accurate, I like to think, is that the Starbucks Experience—personal...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 103–132.
Published: 01 March 2011
... from responsibility are ubiquitous, with committee or board-based decisions dominating corporate practice; more and more complex technical systems being placed between consumers and corporations; and operational management, sales, service, and complaint centers being geographically dispersed on a...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 251–261.
Published: 01 November 2014
... experts who set the intercommunication standards, the interweb has evoked a widely shared ethos, articulated in the 1997 “One Planet, One Net” manifesto of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR). It declared that “there is only one net” that should be available to all, and we are its...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2019) 15 (2): 162–183.
Published: 01 July 2019
... in recent years. No doubt broader intellectual shifts are at least partly responsible for the emphasis that is increasingly placed on music’s social efficacy—that is, the fact that it can do more than simply serve as a resource for expression or representation, but may also function as an instrument...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 101–118.
Published: 01 March 2005
... relates “control” to the widespread deployment of computers by government and corporations, a technology that was at best nascent in 1959 when Naked Lunch appeared. Burroughs, in his introduction, asserts that drug addiction and especially the “hysterical” response it evokes in the government are...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 181–199.
Published: 01 July 2010
... a movement of “spirit.” 2 Monotheism represents, for example, the religious-political adoption of non-orthographic writing, and the theory and practice of the social contract presents a political incorporation of the printed, alphabetical word. For Stiegler, the hyperindustrial support requires...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 53–69.
Published: 01 March 2015
... that defines the superiority of democratic societies over competing social systems. The concept of a free press was extended in the twentieth century to the broadcast media, which were assigned a series of democratic responsibilities. In countries such as Britain, which developed a public-service...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 49–76.
Published: 01 March 2006
..., corporations, professional organizations, and universities – who coordinated survival largely at the expense of existing urban fabric. Together they invented “the house” as a new type of space – at once national, masculine, and high-tech – whose connection to urban densities was casual if not inherently...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 75–100.
Published: 01 March 2005
..., the continued growth of the Internet as a tool for organizing novel forms of information and social interaction requires that Internet politics be continually retheorized from a standpoint that is both critical and reconstructive. By this we mean an approach that is critical of corporate and...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 97–119.
Published: 01 March 2012
... alternative media think tank” called the Raindance Corporation to complement the scene's productions and provide “a theoretical basis for implementing communication tools in the project of social change” ( Gigliotti 2003 ). Raindance was registered as a Delaware corporation in October 1969 and leased a loft...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 329–345.
Published: 01 November 2015
... factory, part and parcel of the military-industrial complex, or a mere puppet of corporate control. The centrality of corporate, neoliberal logics, ideologies of managerialism and excellence, and the universalization of individualist policies over and above public purposes all seem to indicate that the...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 354–371.
Published: 01 November 2018
... affective (representing emotions or stances that go beyond language), demonstrative (where silence substitutes for speech and allows others “to infer particular claims, commitments and responsibilities” [21]), emulative (deriving from social pressures to conform to a norm of silence), or facilitative...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 231–248.
Published: 01 July 2007
... everyday life, and a consciousness about the social responsibilities associated with a given lifestyle. © BERG 2007 PRINTED IN THE UK 2007 lifestyle politics media New Zealand protest Conventional understandings of the public domain have been complicated in recent years by the growing...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 225–243.
Published: 01 July 2018
... War liberalism, from the corporate power of Bell Labs and the military-industrial research university prowess of MIT to the ascendant defense and aerospace economies that supported the rise of LACMA as a powerhouse of Southern California high culture. Yet the social and political ambitions Klüver...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 139–152.
Published: 01 July 2018
..., who pays and who benefits, and what we can do to use the global polity and economy to meet human and social needs and not just corporate needs. This project involves explicating the positive features of globalization like spreading of democracy and human rights contrasted with the negative ones like...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 163–181.
Published: 01 July 2014
... representatives of all stripes, and the corporate and media elite are all engaged in the deceit, which has as its end point the decapitation of democracy. © 2014 Duke University Press 2014 democracy authoritarianism House of Cards Sheldon Wolin Henry Giroux In late 2011, the Wall Street Journal...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 239–262.
Published: 01 November 2013
... understand Walmart as a “panopticon of time,” a corporate manifestation that brings Foucault's famous emblematic prison thoroughly into the neoliberal moment, evolving a diverse, flexible, networked institution that both fundamentally delimits social time and helps produce a range of subjectivities germane...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 110–129.
Published: 01 March 2016
... the limelight. In the process, questions of production, inequality, and reproduction of social structures have been overshadowed. Critical reappraisal of luxury in anthropological theory can paradoxically show us a way out of this identity trap, since luxury, unlike other consumer goods, demands that...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 313–322.
Published: 01 November 2013
...Christine Berberich; Neil Campbell; Robert Hudson This essay examines, in Ben Highmore's words, the implications of “a materialist turn towards the immaterial, towards affect, towards thinglyness, the senses” and how this might be determined by “the social world that produced them.” In viewing the...
Journal Article
Cultural Politics (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 354–375.
Published: 01 November 2014
... the disciplinary and biopolitical apparatuses of state and corporate bodies. As Espeland and Stevens (1998 : 323) conclude: “Commensuration can radically transform the world by creating new social categories and backing them with the weight of powerful institutions. Commensuration is political: it...