This is a book about “the archaeology of recent conflict” written by someone involved in English Heritage as “Head of Military Programmes.” Written with reference to a wide range of theoretical and philosophical reflection as well as archaeology, the author has “current projects” at Greenham Common, Nevada, Berlin, and Valletta in Malta. Schofield draws on Virilio in particular to sketch out a theory of how recent conflicts differ from traditional ones. He wants in particular to be able to distinguish between types of war, and he suggests (p. 23) that there are three main periods: prehistory (siege warfare dominated by weapons of obstruction), medieval (“movement” warfare dominated by weapons of destruction), and modern warfare (total war dominated by “weapons of communication”). This is very broad-brush, and it seems bizarre to call “medieval” all wars up to the mid-nineteenth century. But it is...

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