We argue in this introduction that targeting, in several interrelated and specified senses, must be regarded as intrinsic to urban processes, and that with intensifications of these processes during the last 150 years or so, issues of targeting and questions of the just in relation to cities have become increasingly urgent. With growing concerns about urban war, crime and terrorism, on the one hand, and urban government, administration and policies, on the other, the connection between targeting and justice is more fraught than ever. We examine the nature of the urban ensemble as a network of material and ideal relations that must perpetually negotiate new relations (of justice and targeting) with its outlaws, its misfits and criminals. We explore an emergent geopolitics of urban processes, looking at the need for new paradigms but also at the requirements of a deep historicity that...

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