This volume maps an “urban geopolitics” in which the highly asymmetrical interrelations of our globalizing world are both sustained by, and serve to foster, forms of terrorism. If the events of September 11th brought urban terror home to Western audiences (including many academics), the essays collected and edited by Stephen Graham show how such high-profile spectacles are, in part, the product of often much less visible forms of state terrorism elsewhere. To the extent that the declaration of “war on terrorism” has been (ab)used to legitimize further military operations by the US and its allies – generating, in turn, new enmities against the metropolitan “center” – the cycle continues. Cities, War and Terrorism: Towards An Urban Geopolitics shows how the urban nodes of capitalist modernity that have long been implicated in the destruction of distant people and places appear to be generating...

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