In the wake of the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attacks in 2014, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls stated that there is a “territorial, social, and ethnic apartheid” in France (quoted in Zappi 2016). France is home to the largest North and sub-Saharan African populations in Europe, most of whom live in the geographically segregated suburbs surrounding large metropolitan areas. In the 1990s, rap, hip-hop, and acclaimed “banlieue” (suburb) films like Mathieu Kassovitz’s La haine (1995) brought the banlieues and their residents into public consciousness, in France and internationally. However, to this day, the religious, cultural, economic, and ethnic and racial differences perceived in residents of the banlieues frequently serve to exclude them from the sometimes ill-defined category of normative Frenchness. Postcolonial Paris brings the banlieues, the outer suburbs of Paris, firmly into the foreground in this excellent exploration of the cultural...

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