As an Italian poet, art theorist, and founder of the Futurist movement, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876–1944) originally allied himself with literature, first as a utopian writer, then as a symbolist in the abbaye de Créteil community between 1907 and 1908 (Tisdall and Bozzolla 1978). Marinetti wrote the first Futurist manifesto and rose to fame in the Futurist movement following the manifesto’s publication on the front page of one of France’s most esteemed newspapers, Le Figaro, on February 20, 1909. For Marinetti, the manifesto represented the prefigurement of a world where art and aggression, cruelty, and injustice would be the basis of the coming Futurist society. As Futurism developed, by making common cause with both anarchism and fascism, Marinetti became part of a group of energetic supporters of Benito Mussolini’s fascist regime (1922–43). Marinetti founded the cult of speed and the “new...

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