Our last issue explored global and comparative urbanization, alongside other contributions examining the relationship between subjecthood and states. In this issue we continue to address the work of concepts and subjects in and of history by investigating four interrelated themes: race, internationalism, the law, and, finally, forms of temporality in history.

The opening section, “Race, Law, and Exception,” organized by Sarah Ghabrial focuses on the erasure of complex legal legacies of colonial history and the history of imperial violence from Giorgio Agamben's compelling account of the logic of the state of exception. The essays by Ghabrial and Benoît Challand draw on French imperial history to emphasize the key centrality of race difference to conceptions of personhood and political sovereignty, while the essay by Vanessa Coddacioni underscores their continued relevance for the contemporary legislation of emergency powers in France around conjoint issues of immigration and terrorism. Wadie Said's essay draws on...

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