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Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... of the photographic image into a stable and transparent form of data that can be portrayed as a proxy of human vision. Reflecting on the prominence of the photographic snapshot in machine vision discourse, the article traces the path that made this popular cultural practice amenable to the dataset. Following...
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Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
...Lauren M. E. Goodlad Abstract This editor's introduction welcomes readers to a new interdisciplinary undertaking. The community of practice Critical AI addresses hopes to bring critical thinking of the kind that interpretive disciplines foster into dialogue with work by technologists and others who...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
..., data universalism, and unintentional criti-hype. As the authors touch upon each contribution to this special issue, they call for critical AI studies to forge an interdisciplinary community of practice, alert to ontological commitments, design justice principles, and spaces of dissensus. Copyright ©...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... tension between the openness of the web and the interests of private corporations. It then goes on to sketch an outline for “scrapism,” the practice of using web scraping for artistic, critical, and political ends. splavigne@gmail.com Copyright © 2023 Duke University Press 2023 web scraping...
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Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
...?” Right? SCC: In terms of how I tried to engage the actual practice or relationship between theoretical knowledge, lived experience, and practice-based learning through the book, one way was by trying to clearly and repeatedly talk about “where's this coming from?” Throughout the book, I tried...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
...), as for us, Bourdieu's account of “people's differentiated dispositions and practical habits” and of the “forms of social advantage and disadvantages” that these dispositions produce in social practice offers a powerful framework with which to understand how the moral marking of markets comes to feel natural...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... arrests, harmful government contracts, and toxic neighborhoods. The whole thing, dark and Foucauldian, is emblematic of the way profit motives and carceral practices have influenced our reception of potentially revolutionary modern technology, Benjamin says. It need not be the case that we use local...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... . Takhteyev, Yuri . 2012 . Coding Places: Software Practice in a South American City . Cambridge, MA : MIT Press . Technology of the Oppressed is a richly detailed, beautifully written, and theoretically grounded study of digital inequalities and technologies employed by the mostly Black...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... to ensure that any technology tasked with decision-making power meets the rigorous standards of judgment laid out in the book. This would mean that deep learning, no matter how data-driven, like all forms of research and practice, is indeed accountable to other forms of thought like philosophy...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... down, as statistics often do, to self-serving choices about what to count” (28). O'Neil's training as a mathematician and data scientist adds value to this work of cultural criticism. While she references a host of shaming practices—from the scarlet “A” that Hester Prynne wore, to the public...
Journal Article
Critical AI (2023) 1 (1-2)
Published: 01 October 2023
... “collective capability for humane” treatment of others—but she does not adequately justify these claims (193). By focusing on aberrant sexual practices that few publicly endorse, Botting gives cover for a restrictive treatment of how people have sex with objects. She might see no problem with relatively...