1-20 of 20 Search Results for

zhuangzi

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (4): 489–505.
Published: 01 December 2021
... by Buber’s strong interest in Daoism, and which parallels Wilhelm’s privileging of encounter in its emphasis that “all actual life is encounter” ( Buber, I and Thou 62 ). It goes without saying that Buber was one of the most prominent religious thinkers of the time; despite his interest in the Zhuangzi...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 32–52.
Published: 01 March 2020
... . 5 See passage on spontaneous swimming in Zhuangzi 19.10; see also Csikszentmihalyi ; Møllgaard ; and Wu. 6 Here it is necessary to note that besides Zhuangzian inspiration, Quignard’s focus on écriture without the authority of the author also relates strongly to the context...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 177–179.
Published: 01 March 2007
... skeptical question “Que sai-je?” and expands the question from “What do I know?” to “How do I know?” and “How can I know?” (1). Recounting Zhuangzi’s famous debate concerning his putative knowledge of a fish’s happiness, Longxi acknowl- edges the mutually implicated relationship between skepticism...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 179–182.
Published: 01 March 2007
... skeptical question “Que sai-je?” and expands the question from “What do I know?” to “How do I know?” and “How can I know?” (1). Recounting Zhuangzi’s famous debate concerning his putative knowledge of a fish’s happiness, Longxi acknowl- edges the mutually implicated relationship between skepticism...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 183–189.
Published: 01 March 2007
...?” and expands the question from “What do I know?” to “How do I know?” and “How can I know?” (1). Recounting Zhuangzi’s famous debate concerning his putative knowledge of a fish’s happiness, Longxi acknowl- edges the mutually implicated relationship between skepticism and knowledge, but con- tends...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 190–192.
Published: 01 March 2007
...?” and expands the question from “What do I know?” to “How do I know?” and “How can I know?” (1). Recounting Zhuangzi’s famous debate concerning his putative knowledge of a fish’s happiness, Longxi acknowl- edges the mutually implicated relationship between skepticism and knowledge, but con- tends...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 72–75.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming to that thinker through the lens of a particular strain of Western thought would...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 76–78.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming to that thinker through the lens of a particular strain of Western thought would...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 78–83.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming to that thinker through the lens of a particular strain of Western thought would...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 84–87.
Published: 01 January 2002
... “true otherness.” However, we are still left with a China that is an essentialized Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 88–91.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming to that thinker through the lens of a particular strain of Western thought would...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 91–93.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming to that thinker through the lens of a particular strain of Western thought would...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 94–96.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Other. This contradiction is perhaps the result of the generality of Zhang’s claim. If we were to substitute for “China” a particular Chinese thinker—say “Confucius” or “Zhuangzi” —we might be persuaded that coming to that thinker through the lens of a particular strain of Western thought would...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 178–181.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Chi- nese and Greek philosophical texts, Shankman persuasively argues that, in very different articulations, the Chinese philosophers Laozi and Zhuangzi and the Greek philosopher Plato are all concerned with the question of language and its relationship to philosophi- cal truth or reality...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 181–185.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Chi- nese and Greek philosophical texts, Shankman persuasively argues that, in very different articulations, the Chinese philosophers Laozi and Zhuangzi and the Greek philosopher Plato are all concerned with the question of language and its relationship to philosophi- cal truth or reality...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 185–192.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Chi- nese and Greek philosophical texts, Shankman persuasively argues that, in very different articulations, the Chinese philosophers Laozi and Zhuangzi and the Greek philosopher Plato are all concerned with the question of language and its relationship to philosophi- cal truth or reality...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Chi- nese and Greek philosophical texts, Shankman persuasively argues that, in very different articulations, the Chinese philosophers Laozi and Zhuangzi and the Greek philosopher Plato are all concerned with the question of language and its relationship to philosophi- cal truth or reality...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 195–197.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Chi- nese and Greek philosophical texts, Shankman persuasively argues that, in very different articulations, the Chinese philosophers Laozi and Zhuangzi and the Greek philosopher Plato are all concerned with the question of language and its relationship to philosophi- cal truth or reality...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (2): 112–129.
Published: 01 March 2003
..., they could be associated with any flavor. Moreover, yiyin (lingering sound) and yiwei (lingering taste) recall similar ideas in Laozi’s and Zhuangzi’s Daoist meta- physics. Laozi, for example, states that “The great note is rarefied in sound” (102), and Wang Bi’s annotation further corroborates...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (3): 251–270.
Published: 01 September 2017
...,” The Believer 78 (Feb. 2011): 29–35. Comparative Literature  69:3 DOI 10.1215/00104124-4164396  © 2017 by University of Oregon COMPARATIVE LITERATURE / 252 the “huge and undecipherable unreason of Creation” (49). This perspective is not unique: such thinkers as Zhuangzi and Kierkegaard share his...