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syphilis

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 March 2016
...Katharina N. Piechocki Renaissance poet and physician Girolamo Fracastoro (1478–1553) coined the neologism “syphilis” in the first poem that fictionalizes Columbus's voyage to the New World. Syphilis sive Morbus Gallicus (1530) captures, as this article shows, the bonds among poetic, philological...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 227–246.
Published: 01 June 2014
... that when Langston Hughes translated Vladimir Mayakovsky's “Blek end uait” (“Black and White”) and “Sifilis” (“Syphilis”) during his Moscow residence in the winter of 1932–33, a resulting epiphany motivated Hughes to strive to reconcile his Pan-Africanist views with his newly aroused vision of class...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (4): 269–293.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., as an unnamed physician diagnoses a mulato or zambo constable named Basarrato with syphilis (“la peste de los perros,” literally, “dogs’ disease”) and some unnamed Indian scribes with melancholy. According to the first stanza, they—and Basarrato first among them—were asking their doctor if the dogs...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2023) 75 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 March 2023
... that Monçaide’s intervention and conversion are the last—and pehaps the most—significant actions in the poem’s historical narrative. 25 Compare Syphilis 2.388–89: “‘Haec regio est late, variis ubi foeta metallis’ / Virgo ait, ‘est tellus.’” (“‘This region,’ said the maid ‘where the earth is pregnant...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (3): 299–319.
Published: 01 September 2021
... Akşam . 42 While some female patients and couples visit her for the abortion of illegitimate children, others seek advice for the cure of venereal diseases such as syphilis. In one case, a husband requests the treatment of his overly masculine wife, who physically resembles a man and prefers...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (4): 459–480.
Published: 01 December 2014
... positive for syphilis (“Ano jidai” 3–68). Uno then underwent malaria inoculation therapy at Keio¯ Hospital, which was declared a success, and by 1931 he had produced a comeback novel, Kareki no aru f u¯ k e i (Landscape of Dead Trees, 1933). The metonymy of syphilis and the novel, inter- mediated...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 33–48.
Published: 01 March 2012
... that, as Nuttall’s sexual innuendo slyly implies, transforms cultural contact into syphilis. Nuttall may also be alluding to the seventeenth-century association of the pox with French political absolutism, as witnessed by Locke’s working title for his Two Treatises of Government (1690), de Morbo Gallico.1...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 262–266.
Published: 01 June 2004
... stemming from the publication of what came to be known as the “Sodomite Sonnet.” Appearing in Le Parnasse satirique, an anthology of bawdy verse first published in 1618 and then reissued in 1622, when Théophile’s troubles begin, the sonnet complains of the venereal disease (syphilis) the poet has...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 266–269.
Published: 01 June 2004
... and then reissued in 1622, when Théophile’s troubles begin, the sonnet complains of the venereal disease (syphilis) the poet has contracted from his anagrammatical mistress, the prostitute “Phylis.” The poem then closes with the poet’s vow to confine his future efforts to the anus—whether male or female...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 269–274.
Published: 01 June 2004
... disease (syphilis) the poet has contracted from his anagrammatical mistress, the prostitute “Phylis.” The poem then closes with the poet’s vow to confine his future efforts to the anus—whether male or female is unspecified. The second case is that of the first classic of modern erotic literature...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 274–275.
Published: 01 June 2004
... disease (syphilis) the poet has contracted from his anagrammatical mistress, the prostitute “Phylis.” The poem then closes with the poet’s vow to confine his future efforts to the anus—whether male or female is unspecified. The second case is that of the first classic of modern erotic literature...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 276–278.
Published: 01 June 2004
... and then reissued in 1622, when Théophile’s troubles begin, the sonnet complains of the venereal disease (syphilis) the poet has contracted from his anagrammatical mistress, the prostitute “Phylis.” The poem then closes with the poet’s vow to confine his future efforts to the anus—whether male or female...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 279–281.
Published: 01 June 2004
... and then reissued in 1622, when Théophile’s troubles begin, the sonnet complains of the venereal disease (syphilis) the poet has contracted from his anagrammatical mistress, the prostitute “Phylis.” The poem then closes with the poet’s vow to confine his future efforts to the anus—whether male or female...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (4): 408–435.
Published: 01 December 2019
..., though entertaining” (465). 5 While the medical sciences search for “a cure for cancer, syphilis, and pulmonary consumption,” Harris quips, eugenicists have come up with the “brilliant suggestion that doctors should be empowered to give certificates of sustainability for marriage [which] would...