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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2000) 52 (4): 363–366.
Published: 01 September 2000
...William Storm Dionysus Writes: The Invention of Theatre in Ancient Greece. By Jennifer Wise. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 269 p. University of Oregon 2000 BOOK REVIEWS/363...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2012) 64 (3): 300–315.
Published: 01 September 2012
... nationalities seek refuge, in a side-by-side nature, from the racist storm of white Christian fundamentalism, without losing their singular self-defining traits. © 2012 by University of Oregon 2012 Works Cited Arias Arturo . “Central American-Americans? Re-mapping Latino/Latin American...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2000) 52 (3): 257–259.
Published: 01 June 2000
...Jennifer Wise After Dionysus: A Theory of the Tragic. By William Storm. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 186 p. University of Oregon 2000 BOOK REVIEWS/255 BOOK...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2000) 52 (3): 255–257.
Published: 01 June 2000
... justice. STEPHEN BELCHER AFTER DIONYSUS: A THEORY OF THE TRAGIC. By William Storm. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 186 p. In introducing his contribution to Nothing to Do With Dionysus?, a groundbreaking col...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2000) 52 (3): 259–261.
Published: 01 June 2000
... justice. STEPHEN BELCHER AFTER DIONYSUS: A THEORY OF THE TRAGIC. By William Storm. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 186 p. In introducing his contribution to Nothing to Do With Dionysus?, a groundbreaking col...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2000) 52 (3): 261–263.
Published: 01 June 2000
... fascinating book, but it does not do its rich source material full justice. STEPHEN BELCHER AFTER DIONYSUS: A THEORY OF THE TRAGIC. By William Storm. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 186 p. In introducing his...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2000) 52 (3): 263–266.
Published: 01 June 2000
... justice. STEPHEN BELCHER AFTER DIONYSUS: A THEORY OF THE TRAGIC. By William Storm. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 186 p. In introducing his contribution to Nothing to Do With Dionysus?, a groundbreaking col...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2000) 52 (3): 266–268.
Published: 01 June 2000
... justice. STEPHEN BELCHER AFTER DIONYSUS: A THEORY OF THE TRAGIC. By William Storm. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. 186 p. In introducing his contribution to Nothing to Do With Dionysus?, a groundbreaking col...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2019) 71 (1): 114–116.
Published: 01 March 2019
... primitivism of modernist aesthetics with its “pentatonic democracy.” The efforts of these writers, as So points out, were not unidirectional; for example, in addition to collaborating with Buck and Walsh to translate his novels Moment in Peking (1937) and A Leaf in the Storm (1941), Lin, who would go on...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 27–41.
Published: 01 January 2001
... “parched sensibilities,” there is a near syn- onymous equivalence of “rain” with the earlier “shower of needles” (13; my em- phases); and in the subsequent line and a half—“The storm unleashed within the chamberpot/Was long subsiding”—the meteorological trope is sustained by “storm” and then diminished...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2019) 71 (1): 64–85.
Published: 01 March 2019
... (NMR 5.38) The pine trees all around me. I am sitting on my blue cardigan in the middle of an ocean of leaves, wet and rotting from last night’s storm, as if on a raft, my legs tucked under me. In my bag I have Volume II of Anna Karenina , K. M.’s journal and an orange. (362) Why such a...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 December 2012) 64 (4): 407–428.
Published: 01 December 2012
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2015) 67 (3): 287–311.
Published: 01 September 2015
..., sounding like a storm that is coming from all sides at once. There are shouts and grumbles and gunshots. . . . I can see the gap- ing mouth of the bagasse oven with its swirling sparks. (55; trans. modified) Outnumbered by the workers they are attempting to suppress, two white overseers on horseback...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2008) 60 (2): 125–141.
Published: 01 March 2008
...” of the gods by recounting the fable of the Harpies and the “inferior deities of storm.” “Boreas,” he begins, “occupies an important place in early legend . . . [and] is always connected with [the Harpies] . . . [because] the two sons of Boreas are enemies of the Harpies, and drive them away into...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2012) 64 (1): 1–32.
Published: 01 March 2012
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2012) 64 (2): 150–168.
Published: 01 June 2012
... experience that leaves the poet in the position of a mastless ship buffeted by a storm: “Et mon âme dansait, dansait, vieille gabarre / Sans mâts, sur une mer monstrueuse et sans bords” (51–52; “My soul like a dismasted wreck went driv- ing / Over a monstrous sea without a bourn,” Mathews 113). In...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2000) 52 (4): 366–369.
Published: 01 September 2000
... the storm scenes in King Lear) as to whether particular visual impacts would be best left to the imagination of the reader as opposed to the skills of the scenic designer. In the twentieth century, theatre’s co-existence and progressive competition with other dramatic media intensified the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2000) 52 (4): 369–372.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- givings about the staging of the storm scenes in King Lear) as to whether particular visual impacts would be best left to the imagination of the reader as opposed to the skills of the scenic designer. In the twentieth century, theatre’s co-existence and progressive competition with other...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2000) 52 (4): 372–376.
Published: 01 September 2000
... raised (for example, Charles Lamb’s and A.C. Bradley’s expressed mis- givings about the staging of the storm scenes in King Lear) as to whether particular visual impacts would be best left to the imagination of the reader as opposed to the skills of the scenic designer. In the twentieth century...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 December 2013) 65 (4): 487–490.
Published: 01 December 2013
... modification. He seeks a durable resistance amidst the storm he thinks we inhabit. Nemoianu recognizes that his position is both defensive and challenging; he calls the postmodernist view conventional wisdom. Even more polemical is this claim: “Many positions generally accepted by our contemporaries...