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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 444–465.
Published: 01 December 2018
... era; Henry Roth’s Call It Sleep (1934), where the detritus of a Lower East Side childhood become symbolic totems of a violent coming-of-age; and S. Y. Agnon’s Just Yesterday (Hebrew, 1946), an epic novel of immigration, cultural renaissance, and insanity set in Jaffa and Jerusalem, wherein taxidermy...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (3): 233–261.
Published: 01 June 2001
... . Borbély, Alexander. Secrets of Sleep . New York: Basic Books, 1986 . Burnham, Clint. Jamesonian Unconscious: The Aesthetics of Marxist Theory . Durham: Duke University Press, 1995 . Chekhov, Anton. “Let Me Sleep.” Early Stories . Trans. Patrick Miles and Harvey Pitcher. Oxford: Oxford...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (4): 355–369.
Published: 01 September 2008
... to acknowledge a Prous- tian precedent, only to pervert it beyond recognition. The clearest example is an episode near the end of the book, with Bardamu settled back in the working- class suburbs of Paris. His entry into the room of his sleeping lover Sophie...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (4): 383–407.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Dantesque inferno is the comic mask of a philosophical satire: sleep sole good brief movements of the lower face no sound sole good come quench these two old coals that have nothing more to see and this old kiln destroyed by fire and in all this tenement all this tenement of naught from top to bottom...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (1): 101–122.
Published: 01 March 2013
... And there I shut her wild sad eyes —​ [32] With kisses four. So kiss’d to sleep.         9. And there she lulled me asleep, And there we slumber’d on the moss, And there I dream’d —​Ah! woe betide! And there I dream’d, ah woe...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (3): 251–270.
Published: 01 September 2017
..., Whose Colorless Green Ideas Sleep Furiously.” Web. < http://wwwlinguistics.stanford.edu/Archives/Sesquipedalian/1996-97/msg00033.html >. ———. Readings in Sayable Chinese Volume 2 . San Francisco : Asian Language Publications , 1969 . Print . ALAN LEVINOVITZ Slaying the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 83–102.
Published: 01 March 2020
... Baumgarten defines death. In a first step, he defines being awake as having clear external perceptions: “I AM AWAKE while I am sensing an external being clearly” ( Met . §552). By contrast, sleeping, fainting, and death—all “quite similar to each other” (§556)—are defined as the absence of clear perception...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 352–353.
Published: 01 September 2005
... Mattia Pascal. It can be seen either positively or negatively. For Borges’s Funes, hypermnesia, the inability to forget, is a curse that makes it hard for him to think and even to sleep. “The simple need to sleep therefore requires an elementary art of forgetting,” which turns out to be a version...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 354–355.
Published: 01 September 2005
... Borges’s Funes, hypermnesia, the inability to forget, is a curse that makes it hard for him to think and even to sleep. “The simple need to sleep therefore requires an elementary art of forgetting,” which turns out to be a version of the “places” prescribed in the ancient artes memoriae: Funes can...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 356–358.
Published: 01 September 2005
... in amnesia, which can, of course, be feigned, as it is by the protagonist of Pirandello’s Il fu Mattia Pascal. It can be seen either positively or negatively. For Borges’s Funes, hypermnesia, the inability to forget, is a curse that makes it hard for him to think and even to sleep. “The simple...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 359–361.
Published: 01 September 2005
... Mattia Pascal. It can be seen either positively or negatively. For Borges’s Funes, hypermnesia, the inability to forget, is a curse that makes it hard for him to think and even to sleep. “The simple need to sleep therefore requires an elementary art of forgetting,” which turns out to be a version...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 362–364.
Published: 01 September 2005
... in amnesia, which can, of course, be feigned, as it is by the protagonist of Pirandello’s Il fu Mattia Pascal. It can be seen either positively or negatively. For Borges’s Funes, hypermnesia, the inability to forget, is a curse that makes it hard for him to think and even to sleep. “The simple...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (4): 400–415.
Published: 01 September 2009
... diverse range of disordered impressions that ultimately lead to an insight about the self. Ricoeur declares that at the beginning of Proust’s text there is neither hero nor narrator, only the disordered impression of a sleeping child, reinforced, as often noted, by the initial conjunction of the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 140–157.
Published: 01 March 2007
... human ruins, epitomized in these three poems by prostitutes. The texts are framed by the beginning and the end of the day, thus situating the speaker in a city that still “sleeps” at the thresh- old of awakening. In “Crépuscule du soir” the reductive comparisons of prostitutes to ants and to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (2): 159–179.
Published: 01 June 2020
... contaminated by what George Caffentzis has called the “pollution of nonwork” ( 36 ), which includes everything from unpaid domestic labor to the army of reserve labor to time spent in “sleep and dreams” (260). As I will argue here, Mary Robinson’s 1791 poem “The Maniac” presents such practices in the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 442–461.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Zhou makes explicit that Ermo has no shortage of the asceticism or abstinence necessary for the development of primitive capitalism. Not only does she work while others sleep, thus increasing the duration of “industrial time” for self-profit, but she also refuses to eat in restaurants because of her...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (3): 301–321.
Published: 01 September 2014
... darkness, then a flash again. The separation of our days by sleep almost destroys identity. . . . This insecurity of possession, this quick ebb of power, —​as if life were a thunder-storm wherein you can see by a flash the horizon, and then cannot see your hand, —​tantalizes us. We cannot make the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (4): 408–426.
Published: 01 December 2016
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (1): 19–40.
Published: 01 March 2019
... allow him to sleep with a whole harem “at one time,” or “in one Ann” ( fī ān wāḥid ). The image reveals Mustafa’s yearning for an end to his repetitions, his desire to reach the depths of the vortex: to experience at last a single time, a moment of simultaneity when the fragmented self, reflected in...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (4): 331–346.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Biblical Abraham. This figurative family head sleeps with his own head tied in a “pink and violet scarf of Indian cashmere” and, although his wife doesn’t “feel in the least like sleeping,” he sends her to bed with their son because he doesn’t “need anything” (45-47). He has a delicate constitution and...