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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (3): 235–252.
Published: 01 September 2011
..., and its grammatical structures. In particular, the use of the passive voice, the grammatical expression of the state of being-acted-upon, at key moments in the cycle presents a subject deprived of agency, maintaining priority in the sentence but ceding action to its object. This passive position grants...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (3): 219–226.
Published: 01 June 2005
... to Derrida. Derrida discovers or invents teleopoiesis in reaction to a sentence of Nietzsche’s. The sentence is a prediction: “Ach! Wenn ihr wüßtet, wie es bald, so bald schon —anders kommt!” The English version of The Politics of Friendship translates the sentence this way: “Alas! If only you knew how...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 97–118.
Published: 01 March 2007
... transfer for foveal vision: A factor that has been overlooked in theories of visual word recognition and object presentation.” Brain and Language 88 . 3 ( 2004 ): 259 -67. Carpenter, Patricia A., et al. “Time course of fMRI-activation in language and spatial networks during sentence comprehension...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (3): 252–271.
Published: 01 September 2019
... and Hemingway themselves ascribed a certain truth-value to literature. Chang was committed to “writing the truth within the falseness of modern people” ( Written 19 ), while Hemingway’s famously sparse prose style was always seeking to create, not describe: “All you have to do is write one true sentence,” he...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (3): 270–272.
Published: 01 June 2003
... an overly narrow focus—due partly to Rodowick’s writing style and partly to his choice of a critical canon. There are far too many sentences in Reading the Figural that are more or less like the following (chosen almost at random): “This identification of speech with reason and a pure interiority...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 January 2000
... the farm. Sˇteˇpán and Polana, how- ever, continue to meet covertly and eventually murder Hordubal in his sleep. As punishment, Polana and her lover are sentenced to hard labor—Sˇteˇpán for life, and Polana for twelve years. The entire first section of the novel is devoted to Hordubal’s stream...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (4): 429–445.
Published: 01 December 2012
... into a mock metaphysical theory in order to explode that theory from within by showing us that the sentences that have seduced us into the illusion that they make sense or that we can do philosophy in a traditional vein amount to nothing more than nonsense. If a central aim of the Tractatus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (4): 355–369.
Published: 01 December 2017
... diary: “I believe it is getting the rhythm in writing that matters. Could I get my tomorrow mornings rhythm right —take the skip of my sentence at the right moment —I should reel it off” Diary( II 322). Comparative Literature 69:4 DOI 10.1215/00104124-4260409 © 2017 by University of Oregon...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (4): 301–330.
Published: 01 September 2008
... believed if we trans- lated my words for him into French. And it might  be that thereby we told him nothing —​even indi- rectly —​about what happened “in me” when I uttered my belief. Rather, we pointed out to him a sentence which in his language holds a similar...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 55–67.
Published: 01 January 2010
.... In this dystopian novel, Nabokov describes in painstaking detail the thoughts and feelings of its protagonist, Cincinnatus C., a prisoner who has been incarcerated on preposter- ous charges and sentenced to death by beheading. Cincinnatus’s abundant inte- rior monologues — musings about his place in the world...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 68–82.
Published: 01 March 2020
... as a tidal wave swept me to his side with a sort of blind obstinacy” ( Plague 189–91). From that point on, he tells Rieux, he has dedicated his life to the abolition of capital punishment. 4 The “death sentence” now becomes one of the focal points of Tarrou’s monologue. However, as his reflections...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (3): 268–269.
Published: 01 June 2002
... then is a plagiarist, strictly speaking Jaucourt asks. “He is a man who, wanting at all costs to become an author, and having neither the genius nor the talent necessary, copies not only sentences, but even pages and entire passages of other authors, and has the bad faith not to quote them; or who, by means...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (3): 270–272.
Published: 01 June 2002
... is a man who, wanting at all costs to become an author, and having neither the genius nor the talent necessary, copies not only sentences, but even pages and entire passages of other authors, and has the bad faith not to quote them; or who, by means of a few minor changes in expression or a few...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (3): 273–274.
Published: 01 June 2002
... then is a plagiarist, strictly speaking Jaucourt asks. “He is a man who, wanting at all costs to become an author, and having neither the genius nor the talent necessary, copies not only sentences, but even pages and entire passages of other authors, and has the bad faith not to quote them; or who, by means...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (2): 111–129.
Published: 01 March 2004
... includes photographs of the beams, a schematic drawing of the arrangement of the sentences, and French translations. According to Legros, the inscriptions date, apparently, from before 1580, the year (approximately) of Essai 2.12, “Apology for Raymond Sebond” was composed—the essay that shows...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (1): 86–110.
Published: 01 January 2011
... and not biological facts, and the two sets of data are often so widely discrepant that it is often convenient to discuss kinship without any reference to biology” (107). Yet the difference is estab- lished only to be dismantled in the very next sentence. “All the same,” Leach con- tinues, “any action which...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (1): 54–76.
Published: 01 January 2004
.... And, to be sure, while we “can never hope to get the whole fling of a sentence in Greek as we do in English” (55), to read Greek in transla- tions is useless, insofar as translators, according to Woolf, can only “offer a vague equivalent” (56) of Greek expressions. Their life and their authentic effects...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 93–109.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., but without any order” (Swift 196). Turning the handles will generate every possible sentence in the language, although this vast task proceeds slowly: “Six hours a-day the young students were employed in this labour; and the professor shewed me several vol- umes in large folio already collected...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (1): 72–86.
Published: 01 January 2000
... equalised by the shortening of others. It is a style of singing princi- pally useful for the interpretation of strong feelings, being governed by the accent which is given in ordinary speech.” Gordon Heller (1917) advises the singing student that “He must look upon each phrase as a sort of music sentence...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (1): 74–80.
Published: 01 January 2008
... no choice, unless she wishes to consider herself responsible for his death. Similarly, in the penultimate sentence of his peroration, his declaration that if Floride does not accept him as her “serviteur” he intends to abandon his military career and re- nounce the valor (vertu) that failed to succor...