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rhythm

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (4): 355–369.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Stefanie Heine This article examines how breathing pauses organize prose rhythm in ancient rhetoric and in modernist texts. In Virginia Woolf’s “Time Passes” and “The Lady in the Looking Glass: A Reflection” as well as in a late chapter of Robert Musil’s The Man Without Qualities , breath...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (1): 64–85.
Published: 01 March 2019
... was “expanding”; the term expansion is mentioned more than once in her side notes on the manuscript, and she derived it from her reading of E. M. Forster’s Aspects of the Novel . Forster first advanced the idea of expansion in his chapter “Pattern and Rhythm,” as he was trying to express the literary...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (2): 235–245.
Published: 01 June 2018
...Stefanos Geroulanos Saussy Haun . The Ethnography of Rhythm . New York : Fordham University Press , 2016 . Copyright © 2018 by University of Oregon 2018 Oral literature follows rules that differ from those observed by written literature; it enjoys different privileges...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (1): 46–61.
Published: 01 March 2013
... as the effect of a notion of rhythm that is bound neither to the imperial authority of history nor to mathematical measures, but rather emerges in the variety and contradictoriness of traces that language impresses upon itself, through the play of shifting economies of meaning, changing image patterns...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (4): 430–448.
Published: 01 December 2017
... to draw the traditional rhythm of English blank verse into uneasy relation with the sound of classical epic (traditionally composed in dactylic hexameter). Concomitant with this rhythmic counterpoint is a contrast of voices in the translation, varying between a hard-edged, consonantal “Anglo-Saxon” sound...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (2): 194–212.
Published: 01 June 2019
...Boris Maslov; Tatiana Nikitina Abstract Building on statistical approaches to poetic meter, this article puts forward a new quantitative method for exploring syllabo-accentual verse that takes into account several formal properties, including rhythm, rhyming, and stanzaic architecture. Against...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (4): 367–387.
Published: 01 September 2009
... influences and inflections, an implicit poetics that stands in opposition to his explicit pronouncements. Over the course of his long career, Shlonsky and his critics largely erased from his canonical image the Yiddish resonances and rhythms that surface in his early poetry, as well as the affiliations...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (2): 150–165.
Published: 01 June 2021
...Ada Smailbegović Abstract This article theorizes the edge between the land and the sea in Marianne Moore’s poetry and in Jeff Wall’s photograph “The Flooded Grave.” For these artists, the edge is constituted as an array of fluctuating temporal rhythms created by living organisms and dynamic abiotic...
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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (2): 131–149.
Published: 01 June 2021
... dreamscapes of carbon-based capitalism—but they are also potential commons in which different rhythms of existence come into view. 8 Historian David Richardson notes that after 1780, Liverpool was the “undisputed slaving capital of England and by far the largest slave port in the Atlantic world” (67...
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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (1): 72–86.
Published: 01 January 2000
... attention to Milton’s rhythm . . . His achievements are quite beyond any other English poet’s, perhaps any modern poet’s” (quoted in Abbott, Letters 37-38). Among the Tudor poets, he preferred Surrey to Wyatt: “I have not studied Wyatt, but Surrey I used to read: he, I think, is a greater man. He...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 170–173.
Published: 01 March 2006
... the limits of Heidegger’s and Gadamer’s philosophies of language for exploring the linguistic diversity of historical communities. His new book introduces the idea of rhythm—social, corporeal, and linguistic—in order to give us new ways to articulate the ongoing transformations in our globalized world...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 173–174.
Published: 01 March 2006
... communities. His new book introduces the idea of rhythm—social, corporeal, and linguistic—in order to give us new ways to articulate the ongoing transformations in our globalized world. Michon begins with an overview of theories of globalization, concluding that although there is general consensus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 175–177.
Published: 01 March 2006
... of historical communities. His new book introduces the idea of rhythm—social, corporeal, and linguistic—in order to give us new ways to articulate the ongoing transformations in our globalized world. Michon begins with an overview of theories of globalization, concluding that although there is general...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 177–180.
Published: 01 March 2006
... communities. His new book introduces the idea of rhythm—social, corporeal, and linguistic—in order to give us new ways to articulate the ongoing transformations in our globalized world. Michon begins with an overview of theories of globalization, concluding that although there is general consensus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 180–182.
Published: 01 March 2006
... the linguistic diversity of historical communities. His new book introduces the idea of rhythm—social, corporeal, and linguistic—in order to give us new ways to articulate the ongoing transformations in our globalized world. Michon begins with an overview of theories of globalization, concluding...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 183–185.
Published: 01 March 2006
... the linguistic diversity of historical communities. His new book introduces the idea of rhythm—social, corporeal, and linguistic—in order to give us new ways to articulate the ongoing transformations in our globalized world. Michon begins with an overview of theories of globalization, concluding...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (2): 165–186.
Published: 01 March 2002
... socially, determined. For al- though Whybrow consistently argues for a biological origin of mood, based on strictly biological rhythms, his case studies always seem to suggest that these moods must to some extent be determined by others; the narratives often begin, for ex- ample, with the testimony...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2015) 67 (3): 312–318.
Published: 01 September 2015
...). The rhythm of media history, then, is the long arc of the exile of orality and its triumphant return. Homeric song and television may not be identical, but they rhyme across the ages. The long period of the mind’s alienation in manuscript and print culture —​in forms of objectification, mechanization...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (4): 436–454.
Published: 01 December 2019
... the breath-unit to imagine communal forms of oral recitation, as did Buber and Rosenzweig, Celan drew on this notion to suggest that the poem is an instantiation of the individual rhythms of human speech. Even more so, in his reworking of terms drawn from the Bible translation, poetry not only gives one...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (2): 182–202.
Published: 01 June 2011
... deconstructs mimetic representation and the modes of subjective self-reflection associated with it. He also suggests that rhythm, as a dynamic auditory presence, is prior to the emergence of any kind of visual representation or figure. The emergence and (inevitable) disappearance of rhythm from...