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predatory narration

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 March 2016
... Dostoevsky, played a crucial part in the birth of the American campus novel. © 2016 by University of Oregon 2016 Vladimir Nabokov's Pnin Mary McCarthy's The Groves of Academe campus novel Randall Jarrell predatory narration Works Cited Barabtarlo Gennadi . Phantom of Fact: A Guide...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 209–219.
Published: 01 June 2009
... exceptionalism, which is not to say that it is free of specifi city, idiosyncrasy, or historically differentiated cultural characteristics. Like most human societies, America’s cultures are also inclined to narrate their origins in terms of autogenesis, their historical specifi city cloaked in parthe...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (1): 46–58.
Published: 01 March 2016
... response, the complicity of the poet-narrator is central to an understanding of his war poetry. In “The French Prisoner,” for example, the description of an inmate’s squashed feet and “gibbering, bestial ela- tion” is both precise, as an example of primary witnessing, and discomforting...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 244–255.
Published: 01 June 2009
... without taking into account the ravages of the slave-trade and the forced-labor practices that were the rule under colonialism. More, it requires that one think and feel oneself into those moments and those practices in the manner of Aimé Césaire’s fi rst-person narrator of the Cahier d’un retour...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (4): 320–337.
Published: 01 September 2003
... representations of childhood desires and fears, Semprun illustrates how both his memory of Proust’s peaceful (if neurotic) novel and his postwar consciousness have been colored by his experience of the camps. Semprun’s treatment of Proust —both through the voice of his narrator, Gérard, in the scene...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 103–121.
Published: 01 March 2010
... and worldliness that is his residual class attribute. (In fact, we are told that his confes- sor knows that Tancredi’s failings in this line are guaranteed to produce marital infi delity, but they are apparently so banal and tame as to be not worth the novel’s taking the trouble to narrate them...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (4): 403–420.
Published: 01 December 2021
...” deaths? Cuba’s “biography” as a nation evidences precisely this genealogical proclivity, let alone its theological substratum. For its “birth” as a nation, like so many others, is narrated in terms of epic battles and heroic deaths for the nation’s independence. Indeed, the national epic bore within...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 158–176.
Published: 01 March 2007
... of that Other through the objec- tifying gaze and voice of a Western observer-narrator who sees the Other only as a form of entertainment, a complex of signs to be decoded with the aid of cer- tain cultural referents: songs, films, television broadcasts, books. The Beach In Alex Garland’s The Beach...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 345–365.
Published: 01 December 2011
... qu’une femme fît de lui un homme” (289; that kid just needs a woman to make a man out of him); another calls him “un grotesque,” a word that implies play- acting as much as true monstrosity (234); the narrator similarly dubs him a “far- ceur” or “pretender” (233). Later in the novel, Rosemonde...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (2): 184–208.
Published: 01 June 2021
... famously offered an alternative vision of Baltimore as a seaport city in The Wire , season two, which narrated globalization’s effects on the illicit drug trade and the beleaguered African American and Polish American longshoring communities, the latter emblematized by the corrupt union leader Frank...
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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 402–422.
Published: 01 December 2011
... from whom Faulkner may be taking some of his cues in his critique of the plantation as a political economy depen- dent on a larger imperial design for its success and very existence.11 Nevertheless, 11 Among Conrad’s works, the trilogy featuring the recurring character/narrator Charles Marlow...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2015) 67 (4): 415–428.
Published: 01 December 2015
...; see Erkkila). Second, and perhaps more importantly, she follows the lead of Ralph Ellison, whose narrator declares at the outset of Invisible Man: “No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe” (3). Carrying Ellison’s premises past the end of the twentieth century, Morrison’s...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (2): 203–224.
Published: 01 June 2011
... crime and the silencing or appropriation of their voices. Contra critics who argue that Schlink offers an exculpatory, because explanatory, portrayal of his Nazi protagonist and second-generation German narrator, I argue that The Reader exposes the potential for abuse that characterizes the rhetoric...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (3): 214–232.
Published: 01 June 2001
... Panofsky, considers perspective to be essentially symbolic), the type of culture within which perspective functions is “predatory and mechanistic” (“khishchnicheskii- mekhanicheskii”) (138, 162), so for Ippolit, nature becomes a swallowing ma- chine in Holbein’s “Dead Christ.” Far from denying...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2015) 67 (3): 287–311.
Published: 01 September 2015
... immanence. While the ways in which Le Clézio and Ghosh engage with notions of exile, odyssey, and alterity are dissimilar, their creative goals converge in a shared cri- tique of European colonial dominance and predatory globalization, in a passion for cross-cultural dialogue, and in their genuine...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (2): 150–168.
Published: 01 June 2012
..., the speaker’s almost predatory position, watching his poetic prey from the shadows, is remarkably similar to that of Baudelaire’s flâneur: It chanced a sudden turning of the road Presented to my view an uncouth shape So near that, slipping back...