1-20 of 586 Search Results for

play-acting

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (4): 399–419.
Published: 01 December 2014
... only have sympathy for the misguided reviewer, whose attempt to track down the tale’s sources Hoffmann considered too solemn and serious an endeavor and thus at odds with its intended playfulness. The problem, of course, is that Hoffmann is richly allusive. His sources are manifold and relevant...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (3): 288–302.
Published: 01 September 2017
... agreement.6 Creon’s misogynistic com- ment about the proper place of women is thus highly significant. Indeed, if in a previous Northern Irish Antigone, Tom Paulin’s The Riot Act (1984), Creon resem- bles the “big man” of Ulster Unionism, Ian Paisley, in Heaney’s play the king assumes the form of his...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (3): 312–331.
Published: 01 September 2016
... such as literature and theater. I contend that Pirandello's plays and his vision of stage acting provide an alternative model of subversive performance that challenges Benjamin's assumptions about both the medium-specificity of film's effects and the nature of the new celebrity culture. This alternative further...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 22–40.
Published: 01 January 2010
...' works we see an ambivalent relationship to father figures and a desire to challenge the Oedipal pact demanded by the symbolic by means of a literary act of defiance that involves a move beyond meaning and sense. Moving away from her earlier focus on poetry, Kristeva turns to Louis Aragon, Roland Barthes...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 345–365.
Published: 01 December 2011
...” (289; that kid just needs a woman to make a man out of him); another calls him “un grotesque,” a word that implies play- acting as much as true monstrosity (234); the narrator similarly dubs him a “far- ceur” or “pretender” (233). Later in the novel, Rosemonde, Princesse de Harth, a sexually...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (2): 184–208.
Published: 01 June 2021
... Dutchman dead, but he replies: “that’s not possible.” The Dutchman’s insistence as an undead figure of witness allows the many phases of maritime commerce to array as a historical vision linking the monumental privateer to the late colonial children play-acting in his shadow. Kouwenaar’s poem meditates...
FIGURES | View All (14)
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (2): 155–180.
Published: 01 June 2016
... of power and violence. As the most popular Dutch plays of the 1640s demonstrate, the itinerant style of acting, developed by traveling players performing a broad repertoire of English and Continental plays, made an enormous impact on Dutch theater. Across the late-fifteenth and sixteenth...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (4): 382–406.
Published: 01 December 2012
... character gets only two substantial speeches: the mock-heroic enco­ mium of the art of se­duction in act 1 and the cynic­al apology for hypocrisy at the end of the play. For the rest, when he is not artfully dodging the conse­quences of his misdeeds by juggling peasant girls or fast-talking the hapless...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 January 2009
...- sure acts as a condition for the emergence of the heterodox, which once again appears as the actualization of a retroactively charged foreknowledge or shadow of intelligence. Comic matrix/tragic action. The consequences of the play’s fi rst peripeteia and anagno¯risis are developed...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (1): 19–40.
Published: 01 March 2019
.... Books on the floor. What play-acting is this? What does he mean? Owen. Ford Madox Ford. Stefan Zweig. E. G. Browne. Laski. Hazlitt. Alice in Wonderland . Richards. The Koran in English. The Bible in English. Gilbert Murray. Plato. The Economics of Colonialism Mustafa Sa’eed. The Cross...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2015) 67 (4): 394–414.
Published: 01 December 2015
... at the heart of the plays. Stuart Sperry, for example, writes of the “trauma of [Beatrice’s] father’s touch” and the “traumatic predicament” faced by the spec- tator who must weigh Beatrice’s suffering against her unflinching act of parricide (139). In her discussion of Shelley’s ambivalence about...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 103–121.
Published: 01 March 2010
... . . . No pity Remembrance 2.955). For the men are play-acting, and Charlus in fact owns the brothel in which he stages his scenes of punishment. It not only contrasts with the true horror of the war that is taking place outside; its scenario of a working class turning upon the ruling elite is belied...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (1): 47–63.
Published: 01 January 2011
...Glenn A. Odom This article examines Yael Farber's Molora , an adaptation of The Oresteia , in the context of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a narrative form. I argue that, in performance, the play prevents the culmination of both reconciliation and the tragic form, leaving...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 220–241.
Published: 01 June 2013
... oblique, if playful, way: we remember that we’ve been here before, but the “here” is the space of representation, the space of repetition with a differ- ence. There is something twisted in Shakespeare’s toying with his audience’s memory when what we recall of the past is precisely what is present...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (1): 33–62.
Published: 01 January 2007
... that Médée summons. When she finally resolves to kill her children in Act 5, her speech itself falls into the pattern of sixteenth notes found in her theme. Each time it recurs, the theme implies both that Médée’s person- ality drives the action of the play and that we will truly understand her only after...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (4): 269–290.
Published: 01 September 2000
... experiences “den höchsten Augenblick” (“the highest moment Curiously, it is only from the per- spective of the play’s end that the agreement can plausibly appear to have been a real wager, one that allowed all along for the possibility of winning or losing. What remains the same, however, is that the act...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (2): 192–197.
Published: 01 March 2004
... over professional dramatic per- formance, and, just as the licensing of printed books helped to empower leading stationers, the licensing of plays for performance helped acting companies to establish propriety over the playbooks in their possession. In tracing a differentiation between the monopo...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (2): 198–201.
Published: 01 March 2004
... of printed books helped to empower leading stationers, the licensing of plays for performance helped acting companies to establish propriety over the playbooks in their possession. In tracing a differentiation between the monopo- lies of stage and print and between the performed and printed texts...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (2): 201–203.
Published: 01 March 2004
... of printed books helped to empower leading stationers, the licensing of plays for performance helped acting companies to establish propriety over the playbooks in their possession. In tracing a differentiation between the monopo- lies of stage and print and between the performed and printed texts...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (2): 204–206.
Published: 01 March 2004
... of printed books helped to empower leading stationers, the licensing of plays for performance helped acting companies to establish propriety over the playbooks in their possession. In tracing a differentiation between the monopo- lies of stage and print and between the performed and printed texts...