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plagiarism

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2002) 54 (3): 270–272.
Published: 01 June 2002
...Mark Rose Pragmatic Plagiarism: Authorship, Profit, and Power. By Marilyn Randall. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. xv, 321 p. University of Oregon 2002 COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/268 BOOK REVIEWS AN ETHICS OF...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2002) 54 (3): 268–269.
Published: 01 June 2002
.... CLAUDIA MOSCOVICI University of Michigan, Ann Arbor COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/270 PRAGMATIC PLAGIARISM: AUTHORSHIP, PROFIT, AND POWER. By Marilyn Randall. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. xv, 321 p. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet follows the narrative of Arthur Brooke’s Romeus and...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2002) 54 (3): 273–274.
Published: 01 June 2002
.... CLAUDIA MOSCOVICI University of Michigan, Ann Arbor COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/270 PRAGMATIC PLAGIARISM: AUTHORSHIP, PROFIT, AND POWER. By Marilyn Randall. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. xv, 321 p. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet follows the narrative of Arthur Brooke’s Romeus and...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2008) 60 (3): 261–278.
Published: 01 June 2008
... -88. Broich, Ulrich, ed. Intertextualität . Tubingen: Niedemeyer, 1985 . Dettmar, Kevin J.H. “The Illusion of Modernist Allusion and the Politics of Postmodern Plagiarism.” Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in a Postmodern World . Ed. Lise Buranen and Alice M. Roy. Albany...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2006) 58 (2): 113–127.
Published: 01 March 2006
... best exemplifi es the idea of literary and cultural falsifi cation, or “plagiarism,” is “ Ο vς θα v v vας v COMPARATIVE LITERATURE / 122 (“Sallymarism ‘no pasará’6—of the Academic Professor of Quenology D.P.H This text was fi rst published in 1993 as an annotation to his translation of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2011) 63 (1): 111–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
... discursivity” (85), the book reviews / 113 autonomy of the art object is rated over the creative process, and text is prioritized over document lead to blindness not insight. Eggert does not discuss plagiarism and textual appropriation...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2011) 63 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 January 2011
... insight. Eggert does not discuss plagiarism and textual appropriation, although this juncture in his argument would have been a good place to include them, as one incident that emerged during my reading of his book attests. In a February 28, 2010 New York Times  article, we find the prize-winning...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2011) 63 (1): 117–118.
Published: 01 January 2011
... discursivity” (85), the book reviews / 113 autonomy of the art object is rated over the creative process, and text is prioritized over document lead to blindness not insight. Eggert does not discuss plagiarism and textual appropriation...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2017) 69 (3): 345–348.
Published: 01 September 2017
... there is no Grail, or the Grail is replaced by a sound. The reader could be forgiven for feeling, at times, a little like Kafka, when appealed to by a deluded habitué of literary Prague by the name of Reichmann. This person believed that an essay he had written had been plagiarized in the local...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2015) 67 (1): 114–129.
Published: 01 March 2015
... practice of plagiarism” (1). Both Barthes’s definition of intertextuality and Genette’s reformulation of the concept within his own category of transtextuality help characterize Borges’s approach to fiction in Genette’s words, a poetics that emerges precisely by conceiving litera- ture “in the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2004) 56 (2): 192–197.
Published: 01 March 2004
...: “the author’s property and moral rights” (p. 210). As Loewenstein illustrates in a philological discussion that runs parallel to his account of early modern authorship, this close relationship between proprietary and moral rights originates in the discourse of plagiarism, a word whose etymology...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2004) 56 (2): 198–201.
Published: 01 March 2004
... authorship, this close relationship between proprietary and moral rights originates in the discourse of plagiarism, a word whose etymology (and first literary use, by the epigrammatist Martial) contains the now-forgotten metaphor of kidnapping. This same poet, “unrivalled in Roman literature” for his...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2004) 56 (2): 201–203.
Published: 01 March 2004
... authorship, this close relationship between proprietary and moral rights originates in the discourse of plagiarism, a word whose etymology (and first literary use, by the epigrammatist Martial) contains the now-forgotten metaphor of kidnapping. This same poet, “unrivalled in Roman literature” for his...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2004) 56 (2): 204–206.
Published: 01 March 2004
... authorship, this close relationship between proprietary and moral rights originates in the discourse of plagiarism, a word whose etymology (and first literary use, by the epigrammatist Martial) contains the now-forgotten metaphor of kidnapping. This same poet, “unrivalled in Roman literature” for his...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2008) 60 (2): 107–124.
Published: 01 March 2008
... “‘plagia[t] par anticipation’” (Le Lionnais “Le second Manifeste” 27) for plagiarism. This concept cannot be evoked without reference to Baudelaire, who defended his friend Manet, accused of pastiche, and, simultaneously himself, accused of plagiariz- ing Poe, by claiming that an artist can be...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2010) 62 (3): 302–305.
Published: 01 June 2010
...). Starting with a defamatory open letter in 1953, Claire Goll, widow of the late Ivan Goll, fabricated a series of vicious accusations about Celan, claiming that he had plagiarized her husband’s poetry; Celan saw these accusations as not only an attack on himself, but also a symptom of lingering...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2010) 62 (3): 305–307.
Published: 01 June 2010
...). Starting with a defamatory open letter in 1953, Claire Goll, widow of the late Ivan Goll, fabricated a series of vicious accusations about Celan, claiming that he had plagiarized her husband’s poetry; Celan saw these accusations as not only an attack on himself, but also a symptom of lingering...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2010) 62 (3): 308–311.
Published: 01 June 2010
...). Starting with a defamatory open letter in 1953, Claire Goll, widow of the late Ivan Goll, fabricated a series of vicious accusations about Celan, claiming that he had plagiarized her husband’s poetry; Celan saw these accusations as not only an attack on himself, but also a symptom of lingering...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2010) 62 (3): 311–314.
Published: 01 June 2010
... with a defamatory open letter in 1953, Claire Goll, widow of the late Ivan Goll, fabricated a series of vicious accusations about Celan, claiming that he had plagiarized her husband’s poetry; Celan saw these accusations as not only an attack on himself, but also a symptom of lingering postwar...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2000) 52 (1): 87–90.
Published: 01 January 2000
... plagiarism: What defined the commodity known as “copy”? Who had “propriety” in it? What were the procedural means for establish- ing “propriety,” and how might it be secured and defended? How did “propriety” impinge upon the cultural reception and uses of books? While exploring the particu- larly...