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phallus

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 161–178.
Published: 01 March 2010
... interpretations of “The Nose” that dominated both Formalist and psychoanalytic literary criticism in early-twentieth-century Russia. Copying and revising Freudian interpretations of “The Nose,” wherein the nose symbolizes the phallus, Ugrešić substitutes Nada Matić—the female plastic surgeon who finds Mato...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (2): 95–112.
Published: 01 March 2006
... disavowal as the perverse response to the sight of the female genitals and thus to awareness of “castration,” Deleuze writes: The process of disavowal is linked to castration not contingently but essentially and originally; the expression of fetishistic disavowal, “No, the mother does not lack a phallus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (1): 42–57.
Published: 01 January 2001
.... True to Lacanian theory, the penis is not just a corporeal implement of sexual pleasure, but a totemistic phallus representing authority negotiated via speech (see Forrey). Portnoy, for instance, describes his father as follows: . . . to me, with that fingertip of a prick that my mother likes to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 227–242.
Published: 01 June 2004
..., you’ve emptied me out.” (49-50) Food comes after phallus in this man’s world, and the physical disability of this character provides further proof of Beyala’s reluctance to accord her male char- acters a subjectivity beyond the base instincts of their phalluses. Thus, when her men are not physically...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (2): 177–185.
Published: 01 March 2003
... gaze to the spectator. Given old and new mythologies of I and eyes that relate blinding8 to knowledge and sight to castration, and that treat the phallus as apotropaic symbol of sexual power (the evil eye) and the work of art as an instance of “localizing the Thing” (L’Éthique 169); and granted...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (2): 185–190.
Published: 01 March 2003
... phallus as apotropaic symbol of sexual power (the evil eye) and the work of art as an instance of “localizing the Thing” (L’Éthique 169); and granted that one might conceive of shame as a veil and the “experience of the beautiful” as the location of and likewise the “bar” to “radical desire,” and...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 262–266.
Published: 01 June 2004
... not simply to lampoon personal coarse- ness and folly, we get traditional “bawdy”: the “priapic” celebration of “polymorphous” male desires whose comic emblem is the outsized phallus borne by the satyr-god Priapus. A first point then is that in modern usage obscenity becomes more specialized...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 266–269.
Published: 01 June 2004
... “indecent”; and when applied to sexual matters, where the aim was not simply to lampoon personal coarse- ness and folly, we get traditional “bawdy”: the “priapic” celebration of “polymorphous” male desires whose comic emblem is the outsized phallus borne by the satyr-god Priapus. A first point then is...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 269–274.
Published: 01 June 2004
... not simply to lampoon personal coarse- ness and folly, we get traditional “bawdy”: the “priapic” celebration of “polymorphous” male desires whose comic emblem is the outsized phallus borne by the satyr-god Priapus. A first point then is that in modern usage obscenity becomes more specialized...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 274–275.
Published: 01 June 2004
... “indecent”; and when applied to sexual matters, where the aim was not simply to lampoon personal coarse- ness and folly, we get traditional “bawdy”: the “priapic” celebration of “polymorphous” male desires whose comic emblem is the outsized phallus borne by the satyr-god Priapus. A first point then is...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 276–278.
Published: 01 June 2004
... get traditional “bawdy”: the “priapic” celebration of “polymorphous” male desires whose comic emblem is the outsized phallus borne by the satyr-god Priapus. A first point then is that in modern usage obscenity becomes more specialized, narrowing its range to specifically sexual activities and the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (3): 279–281.
Published: 01 June 2004
... “indecent”; and when applied to sexual matters, where the aim was not simply to lampoon personal coarse- ness and folly, we get traditional “bawdy”: the “priapic” celebration of “polymorphous” male desires whose comic emblem is the outsized phallus borne by the satyr-god Priapus. A first point then is...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 383–401.
Published: 01 December 2011
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (2): 143–159.
Published: 01 June 2017
.... When Seth discovered the hidden chest-tomb and recognized the body of his hated brother, he cut it into fourteen parts (in order to prevent its reanimation) and tossed them into the surrounding swamps. Isis went through the swamps in a boat and collected all the parts except for the phallus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 44–58.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., of the phallus, of the ob- ject (a Man’s activity is a panoply of somatic and linguistic symptoms provoked by the originary cause of woman. That traumatic incision is not necessarily woman’s act, although it can be; Zˇizˇek uses a more passive language here to say that it is “on the side of woman...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (2): 176–193.
Published: 01 June 2018
... women aren’t castrated?”—that women’s bodies reverberate with a “profusion of meanings” wholly separate from the presence or absence of a phallus (885)? In Cixous’s version, Medusa’s traditional immobilizing stare is replaced by a “laugh” that cuts through the cultural underpinnings of gendered dread...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 408–425.
Published: 01 December 2018
... praise from heaven to earth, yet the insistence on a god in common leads to the phallus as lowest common denominator, a short-circuiting of desire that cancels out the very world that was to be affirmed. To do Rilke justice, one must understand these efforts as a counter-mythology opposing what he...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (4): 325–356.
Published: 01 September 2002
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 205–222.
Published: 01 June 2006
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 346–365.
Published: 01 June 2009