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nightingale

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (4): 418–438.
Published: 01 December 2020
...Hunter Dukes Abstract Philomela holds a privileged place in Euro-American poetry. Tracking the nightingales in Ovid, Marie de France, Gascoigne, Shakespeare, Milton, Coleridge, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning reveals a new dimension of an old trope. Frequently paired with images of architectural...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 151–169.
Published: 01 March 2001
... suddenly pod nogi upada mu at his feet falls skamienial/y sl/owik a petrified nightingale odwraca gl/owe˛ he looks back i widzi and sees z˙e drzewo do którego przywia˛zany byl...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (1): 23–40.
Published: 01 March 2021
... he embedded in his writings the cosmic world music in human historical time, presenting no longer a distant metaphysical reality but, rather, one embedded in the sequences of human time ( 432–34 ). Interestingly, during the Middle Ages the nightingale, as the greatest singer of nature, became...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (3): 288–302.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Miller . Ed. Martin R.A. . New York : Viking Press , 1978 . Print . Nightingale Benedict . Rev. of The Burial at Thebes , by Heaney Seamus . The Times [London] 21 Sept. 2007 . Web. 30 Sept. 2015 . < http://www4.0pen.ac.uk/csdb/ASP/ViewDetails.asp?ProductionID=2799...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 181–185.
Published: 01 March 2005
... University Press, 1986 . Michelini, Ann N., ed. Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy . Leiden, 2003 . Morgan, Kathryn A. Myth and Philosophy from the Pre-Socratics to Plato . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000 . Nightingale, Andrea. Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 178–181.
Published: 01 March 2005
... philosophic project (see Morgan; Nightingale; Rutherford). The two books un- der review explore this question in different ways. Blondell argues that Plato’s attention to characterization is not a purely “literary” technique entailed by the dialogue form (for one must still ask, why write dialogues...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 185–192.
Published: 01 March 2005
... antithesis, but the past ten years have made the important advance of asking in what ways Plato may have seen writing and reading as inseparable from his philosophic project (see Morgan; Nightingale; Rutherford). The two books un- der review explore this question in different ways. Blondell argues...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2005
... philosophic project (see Morgan; Nightingale; Rutherford). The two books un- der review explore this question in different ways. Blondell argues that Plato’s attention to characterization is not a purely “literary” technique entailed by the dialogue form (for one must still ask, why write dialogues...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 195–197.
Published: 01 March 2005
... that it remained within the honey-medicine antithesis, but the past ten years have made the important advance of asking in what ways Plato may have seen writing and reading as inseparable from his philosophic project (see Morgan; Nightingale; Rutherford). The two books un- der review explore this question...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 73–98.
Published: 01 March 2022
... by roses; And the nightingale, the lover of roses, Is startled, and flies away from the graveside vines. ( Maslov 98–104 ) In fact, just like Byron and his Russian imitators, Küchelbecker footnotes two of these details by noting that the marble turban on a grave is a “Muslim custom” and that he has...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (1): 54–76.
Published: 01 January 2004
... manipu- lated. But if it is only in Sophocles that “the nightingale whose song echoes through English literature” (45) can be heard “singing in her own Greek tongue” (45), Woolf observes that what for us is the “immortality” of that tongue still cannot tell us how it sounded in its own context...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (3): 296–311.
Published: 01 September 2016
... of frogs, interrupted by the trills and whistles of nightingales from the park, one distant and one close under the window in a blossoming lilac bush” (PSS 32: 203). Nature is in harmony. Only people fail to understand their place in the Whole. Tolstoy is not suggesting, however, that one can avoid...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (4): 421–441.
Published: 01 December 2021
... with a thousand bovine faces; stiff and shrouded with frozen wreaths. The girl full of tears was bathing in flames, and the nightingale wept with its wings burnt. ( Lorca 59 ) The two poems echo one another not only in their use of similar images: Lorca’s “immaculate dawn,” Ibn al-Rūmī’s dawn...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (4): 439–459.
Published: 01 December 2020
..., Barbara Turitto, and Elido Fazi under the title A passeggio con John Keats . 7 The excerpted lines from Coleridge’s “Nightingale” are:              Poet who hath been building up the rhyme                      When he had better far have stretched his limbs Beside a brook in mossy forest...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 170–172.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to Romantic writing such as Keats’s “Ode to a Night- ingale” (p. 171), in which the poet’s identification with the tradition of the nightingale, from Homer to the troubadours, heretofore consoling, is only temporary, and that ulti- mately he is alone: “Forlorn! the very word is like a bell/To toll me back...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 172–174.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to Romantic writing such as Keats’s “Ode to a Night- ingale” (p. 171), in which the poet’s identification with the tradition of the nightingale, from Homer to the troubadours, heretofore consoling, is only temporary, and that ulti- mately he is alone: “Forlorn! the very word is like a bell/To toll me back...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 175–176.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to Romantic writing such as Keats’s “Ode to a Night- ingale” (p. 171), in which the poet’s identification with the tradition of the nightingale, from Homer to the troubadours, heretofore consoling, is only temporary, and that ulti- mately he is alone: “Forlorn! the very word is like a bell/To toll me back...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 177–178.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to Romantic writing such as Keats’s “Ode to a Night- ingale” (p. 171), in which the poet’s identification with the tradition of the nightingale, from Homer to the troubadours, heretofore consoling, is only temporary, and that ulti- mately he is alone: “Forlorn! the very word is like a bell/To toll me back...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 178–180.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to Romantic writing such as Keats’s “Ode to a Night- ingale” (p. 171), in which the poet’s identification with the tradition of the nightingale, from Homer to the troubadours, heretofore consoling, is only temporary, and that ulti- mately he is alone: “Forlorn! the very word is like a bell/To toll me back...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 181–182.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to Romantic writing such as Keats’s “Ode to a Night- ingale” (p. 171), in which the poet’s identification with the tradition of the nightingale, from Homer to the troubadours, heretofore consoling, is only temporary, and that ulti- mately he is alone: “Forlorn! the very word is like a bell/To toll me back...