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line breaks

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2023) 75 (3): 373–391.
Published: 01 September 2023
...Kayvan Tahmasebian; Rebecca Ruth Gould Abstract Line breaks are arguably the defining feature of poetry, in the absence of which a text becomes prose. Consequently, the translation of line breaks is a decisive issue for every poetry translator. Classical and modern literary theorists have argued...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (4): 436–454.
Published: 01 December 2019
... Kolen (cola) and breath-units, leaving a significant amount of white space on the page. However, contrary to appearances, Buber and Rosenzweig sought to reproduce, through the cola, a pattern of oral speech whereby the reader knows when to briefly pause according to the line breaks. The Hebrew original...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 328–351.
Published: 01 September 2005
... is actually an end, or merely an instance of ending. Although each line seems to force the reader to undergo the experience of misreading or confusion, the correct readings seem, deceptively, to reveal the accuracy of the misreading. Like the other breaks in the first quatrain, the break between lines 3...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (3): 320–343.
Published: 01 September 2021
... of either five or six that were neither long nor short, and were distinguished by a light stress at the beginning of the line. The stress—which had no place in any traditional South Asian prosodic systems—would serve to differentiate syllabic feet without the use of a caesura, rhyme, or line break...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (4): 462–463.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of attending to line-breaks, word choice, rhythm, and so on? Close reading, after all, isn’t the kind of “intense and deliberated inattention  to poems” that Izenberg advocates. So how do we read poems at all? Even Izenberg doesn’t totally escape the allure of close reading in his book, although he...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (4): 463–466.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of attending to line-breaks, word choice, rhythm, and so on? Close reading, after all, isn’t the kind of “intense and deliberated inattention  to poems” that Izenberg advocates. So how do we read poems at all? Even Izenberg doesn’t totally escape the allure of close reading in his book, although he...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (4): 466–468.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of attending to line-breaks, word choice, rhythm, and so on? Close reading, after all, isn’t the kind of “intense and deliberated inattention  to poems” that Izenberg advocates. So how do we read poems at all? Even Izenberg doesn’t totally escape the allure of close reading in his book, although he...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (4): 468–470.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of attending to line-breaks, word choice, rhythm, and so on? Close reading, after all, isn’t the kind of “intense and deliberated inattention  to poems” that Izenberg advocates. So how do we read poems at all? Even Izenberg doesn’t totally escape the allure of close reading in his book, although he...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (3): 306–325.
Published: 01 September 2022
....” Although, the line break between these words tempers the feeling of outright suffocation, this swelling is reflected in the larger shape of the poem, which ends with longer lines than the middle section. Moreover, the emphasis on the sea’s eternity and myth’s immortality through the use of “always...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (2): 154–170.
Published: 01 June 2019
... as it is in English, the em-dash in Shalamov’s “ Eto—russkoe stikhotvorenie ” at the very least invites comparison with Saltykov-Shchedrin’s “ Ia—russkii literator ” and may lend emphasis to the word russkoe ( Russian ). The em-dash is sometimes marked in Russian poetry, which deploys punctuation, line breaks...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (2): 207–229.
Published: 01 June 2012
... of truth through the line break. The second question, however, implies that pursuing truth in this way — seeking a point that will define it as “enough”— can only go so far before it expresses some- thing other than “love,” that is, before its motivations for knowing reveal them- selves as more...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2015) 67 (1): 79–93.
Published: 01 March 2015
... for the three adaptations included. However, the inter- nal title page for this play offers a confusing blur of authorial names: “‘The Beast in the Jungle (line break) by Henry James.’ Theatrical adaptation by James 4 A French-speaking American, Lord was stationed in France during World War II...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 25–51.
Published: 01 March 2022
..., the ghazal plays out the themes of separation and union inaugurated with the first verse; the line break between verses, but also between the two hemistiches of each verse, then, represents the “parting” that the poet worries over. We can also see his exploitation of this tension between the two lines...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2024) 76 (1): 44–64.
Published: 01 March 2024
... a refrain. You start to put a beat to it, your own rhythm. I do, anyway. And right as it reaches the diminished pleasure of too much repetition a line breaks through like sunlight, clean and smooth if you can handle that tricky triple L , an alveolar even native English speakers can struggle...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (3): 278–294.
Published: 01 September 2018
... and les lettres de mon père underneath, after a line break. I follow this presentation without period and noncapitalized lettres for reasons that will become apparent later. The text has not been translated into English; all translations are mine. 4 Derrida’s hesitation regarding the term...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (3): 269–290.
Published: 01 September 2011
... to Andromaque Andromaque, je pense à vous!” —​by a dramatic shift to the analogical pattern that also comes to replace it: “Andromaque, je pense à vous! Ce petit fleuve,/ Pauvre et tristemiroir . . .” The line- break functions here as a hinge that turns the reflection of an implied simile back on itself...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (4): 430–448.
Published: 01 December 2017
... stress more or less emphati- cally. Even if stressed in this way, however, the lines don’t conform exactly to Old English meter rules, since there are more than two stresses per half-line, and the arrangement of “curved / Sterns” over a line-break introduces a notion of enjamb- ment that belongs...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 208–226.
Published: 01 June 2014
... / to hear / a sound within / An empty furrow / to receive.” The offset line breaks are dissonant breaths, perhaps even dissonant speakers. There is also a sense of extension, which is dimensional and voluminous, implied by indicators like “within” and “empty furrow.” The “ear is a spiral” drawn...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (4): 438–458.
Published: 01 December 2014
... meaning “to I.”13 Stripped of its negative prefix, “vernichtet” (annihilate) gives way across the line break to “ichten,” to I-ilate. Pausing in the caesura of this final poem ofBreathturn , the reader transforms the ultimate genocidal negation —​the object of the Nazi “Vernichtungskrieg...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (2): 107–113.
Published: 01 June 2020
...Taylor Schey; Jan Mieszkowski In “Passing Impasse,” the final essay of the issue, Anne-Lise François interrogates how the figure of trespassing has shaped ecological thought. Although environmental harm is often imagined in terms of an invisible line that human activity must not pass...