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lament

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (3): 201–227.
Published: 01 June 2010
...VLADIMIR ZORIĆ This article examines interlingual poetry of exile in the context of different theories of language in poetry and focuses on Miloš Crnjanski's (1893–1977) poem “Lament nad Beogradom” (“Lament over Belgrade”). The article claims that interlingual poetry of exile has been a blind...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (3): 285–305.
Published: 01 September 2013
... history troubles conventional scholarship on secularization, which tends to focus on the legacy of the Protestant Reformation and Northern European Enlightenment while either lamenting an apparent theological backwardness south of the Pyrenees or ignoring the peninsula altogether. It is not my goal...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 369–391.
Published: 01 December 2018
... that strengthened their hermeneutics of psychic and discursive disturbance. Through the specific rhetorical figure of the musical lament found in psychoanalytical discourse, the article demonstrates the way dissonances implicate opera, the madrigal, and the talking-cure, making aporetic claims, especially...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (2): 97–126.
Published: 01 March 2002
... of the pool (“superficiem illam”) provides a substitute for, as well as a vision of, the self that cannot otherwise be grasped. This paradoxical desire to wrest self from self via reflection is precisely what Ovid conveys in Narcissus’s lament: “iste ego sum . . ./o utinam a nostro secedere corpore possem...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (2): 97–118.
Published: 01 March 2000
... COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/106 demnach das Urphänomen des (sprachlichen) Lyrischen dar: in der Interjektion ‘Ach!’ wurzelt sozusagen all Lyrik” (335). (“An outcry announcing pain, jubila- tion, or lament represents accordingly the primordial phenomenon of the [ver- bal] lyric: in the interjection ah, so...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 408–425.
Published: 01 December 2018
... from lament to praise and, thereby, from disenchantment to enchantment. Yet these are not and never can be strictly chronologically or logically consecutive, but are instead correlative; the shift can only ever be one of emphasis, something Rilke readily admits. “Nur im Raum der Rühmung darf die Klage...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 151–169.
Published: 01 March 2001
.... The extremity of his punishment—beyond human comprehension—does not exclude the possibility of sympathy. Moreover, Ovid projects his sympathy onto a bucolic setting (see below), describing the beings of the region lamenting the satyr’s death7 and forming a river named Marsyas from their tears.8...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (1): 85–100.
Published: 01 March 2013
... the trees and the creatures that live in the woods with feelings, and in their elegiac lament over deforestation, Statius, Boccaccio, and Chaucer pro- vide a concrete example of what Coetzee means by the “sympathetic imagination.” Indeed, elegy, as the genre in which sympathy and loss intertwine...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (1): 74–90.
Published: 01 March 2017
... and the blood streaking down his body —​ serves to maximize the emotive impact. Roland repeatedly laments both his per- sonal loss and that of France; he faints several times and weeps as he directly addresses his dying companion and later voices his sorrow in the manner of an epic commiseration...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (1): 33–62.
Published: 01 January 2007
... the eye wanders, and the work is false” (Works 13.20). With the aim of making his plot well balanced, Thomas Corneille delays Médée’s discovery of Jason’s secret plans to marry Créuse. Whereas Euripides’ Medea has already been abandoned by Jason when she sings her opening lament from within her...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 242–246.
Published: 01 June 2013
...: Bucknell University Press, 2011. 207 p. “To make an attempt to understand his dying, and not to die with him, I would write about it.” –Jamaica Kincaid. While the literary field of lamentation has long been recognized as an important lens, especially for poetry, the interplay of historical trauma...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 246–249.
Published: 01 June 2013
...: Bucknell University Press, 2011. 207 p. “To make an attempt to understand his dying, and not to die with him, I would write about it.” –Jamaica Kincaid. While the literary field of lamentation has long been recognized as an important lens, especially for poetry, the interplay of historical trauma...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 249–251.
Published: 01 June 2013
...: Bucknell University Press, 2011. 207 p. “To make an attempt to understand his dying, and not to die with him, I would write about it.” –Jamaica Kincaid. While the literary field of lamentation has long been recognized as an important lens, especially for poetry, the interplay of historical trauma...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 251–253.
Published: 01 June 2013
...: Bucknell University Press, 2011. 207 p. “To make an attempt to understand his dying, and not to die with him, I would write about it.” –Jamaica Kincaid. While the literary field of lamentation has long been recognized as an important lens, especially for poetry, the interplay of historical trauma...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 254–256.
Published: 01 June 2013
...: Bucknell University Press, 2011. 207 p. “To make an attempt to understand his dying, and not to die with him, I would write about it.” –Jamaica Kincaid. While the literary field of lamentation has long been recognized as an important lens, especially for poetry, the interplay of historical trauma...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 73–92.
Published: 01 March 2012
...) if it is divorced from the common speech (bol chal) of the nation’s people. “How long,” he laments, “will Persian and Arabic travel on the shoulders of our poetry? When will that day come when our poets will favor our own language?” (14). Because the rejection of Persian had long been a touchstone...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 366–382.
Published: 01 December 2011
... sentimental as they recall “Georgian vistas” or homosocial bonds during the war, although Bowen harshly decries the latter as “Kiplingesque laments for ‘Archie, Johnnie and me’” (11a). Unlike perpetrator testimony, they are often strikingly self-critical (see “My Hands” and “Chindit” in The Voice of War...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (4): 460–462.
Published: 01 December 2020
... Islam and Christianity as a prefiguration of modern European colonialism in the region. Calderwood’s reading of the works of Mufaddal Afayal (1824–87) deploys the idea of al-Andalus in an era of Spanish and French colonial domination of Morocco. Reading Afayal’s lament for Tétouan and his Chronicle...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (1): 46–58.
Published: 01 March 2016
... in Holocaust Poetry (150–53), Hughes’s sensitivity to such times when —​as he puts it his intro- duction to Pilinszky’s work the moment closest to extinction turns out to be the creative moment” led to the lamentable Hughes poem “Lines about Elias,” in which Nazi guards enjoy salvation through music...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (2): 160–175.
Published: 01 June 2018
... in the poem’s deep relationship to the act of mourning. As Dué argues, “epic poetry is infused with the imagery, themes, and language of lament, so much so that a number of scholars have speculated that women’s lament traditions played a crucial role in the development of epic. Epic poetry narrates the glory...