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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (1): 36–45.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Translator's Unconscious.” Translation Studies: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline . Ed. Riccardi Alessandra . Cambridge : Cambridge UP , 2002 . Print . Eleanor Kaufman On Not Knowing the Original Language: French Philosophy against...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (4): 347–361.
Published: 01 September 2004
... War and the Hellenic Splendor of Knowing: Levinas, Euripides, Celan lovcou d j ejxevbain j [Arh", kovra" e[rga Pallavdo". (Ares was emerging from his ambush— [it was] the doing of the maiden Pallas...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (2): 207–229.
Published: 01 June 2012
... broadly, it finds in imagined encounters with resistant interiors answers to the question of what it means to want to know, to understand, or to relate to an other and argues that, in the face of irrevocable remoteness, poetry's potential for repair resides in the restoration rather than resolution of its...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 173–185.
Published: 01 June 2014
... in his clothes, leaving him only a pauper's vestments. In the Arthurian tale, the problem posed is how to know the true inner self when two identical-looking women both claim to be the “true” queen — a question that is complicated by the fact that the “true” Guenevere has been “false” for many years...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 208–226.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Smithson in Spiral Jetty (1972), to D'Arcy Thompson's writing on the mathematics of biological and zoological examples of spirals and sea shells (1917), and to Vicuña's more recent poetic experiments in text, form, and philology in Instan (2002). The construction of alternative modes of “knowing” and...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 January 2009
...MICHELLE L. ZERBA Doubt is intrinsic to our situation as beings immersed in a world that connects us to people at the same time that it renders impossible the certainty of knowing their minds. It has both an affective side that is linked with such kindred emotions as fear, anxiety, and suspicion...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (4): 315–335.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Robert Weninger In our era of ever accelerating globalization, scholars of Comparative Literature are increasingly required to study texts from cultures they do not know and written in languages in which they are not proficient. As a result more and more comparatists find themselves called upon to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (3): 256–272.
Published: 01 June 2005
... unnecessary diffidence about the fact that I am read. You know, I am kind of a nervous writer . . . so I was not in a frame of mind where I would respond to responses, you know. And for me, responsibility is a huge idea, you know, answering. And so I enjoyed reading these things, but I was so over...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (1): 1–2.
Published: 01 January 2011
... which programs to cancel is the idea that a broad education, and a large group of people benefiting from such education, is a public good. I don’t know Arabic or Tamil or Old Norse myself, but it enriches my life to be in a circle of people that includes some who do. I don’t play in a symphony...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (3): 219–226.
Published: 01 June 2005
... this way: “Alas! If only you knew how soon, how very soon, things will be —different!” Derrida responds at length, and I cite him at length: What a sentence! Is it a sentence? Do we know that—that things will be different; and how very soon things will be different? Do we not already know that...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (4): 481–488.
Published: 01 December 2014
.... There we sang the songs, said our Cub Scout pledge, and attempted to ori- ent ourselves, somewhat awkwardly, toward the profoundly American ethos of the Scout Handbook. As those of you who have been in the Cub Scouts know, much of it revolves around receiving badges for various sorts of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (3): 207–213.
Published: 01 June 2005
... the utter annihilation of the being-there that is their absolute ontological ground.1 One can imagine one’s corpse, one can witness the dying of others or the dead, but one cannot know or imagine being dead, itself an oxymoronic formulation. To translate: how could we, to the extent that we are...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 438–447.
Published: 01 December 2011
... village — the dogs and roosters of which were audible, and the windmills visible, from our own. I would be reminding you of the bounded and relative character of knowledge, the slippage by which we fall back from the desire to know things in their complete otherness to the often rather predictable...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 131–150.
Published: 01 March 2001
... the skaldic meter of Old Norse, the dróttkvætt, which serves as the basis of the duet in “The Masque”; for a discussion of the form, see Gordon 295-96. 5 All citations of “Canzone” are from this edition. As far as I know, “Canzone” has not been the subject of any sustained interpretative efforts...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 247–250.
Published: 01 June 2014
...  and Mark Edmundson’s Why Read?  to lobby for the use- value of reading and teaching “verbal performance[s] in which the events depicted never happened, and in which everyone knows they didn’t” (3). This is no paean to the “glorious uselessness” of the literary arts; Landy’s approach is cheerfully...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (4): 301–330.
Published: 01 September 2008
... more conventionally successful Englishing does. Improbable —​but how would one know? On what grounds would one make such a decision? What might be at stake in deciding one way or another 2 I say “nameless translator,” but this isn’t true of recent editions...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 117–130.
Published: 01 March 2001
... objections against Darwinism, not those stemming from know-nothing reli- gious outcry, but those rooted in philosophy. These objections contend that, far from offering a compelling theory, Darwinism undercuts its own scientific author- ity and even refutes itself—that it takes away our reason to believe...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2021
... Bovary and Cervantes’s Don Quixote ) and in his fiction. 4 Know thy enemy, know thy self: as a novel that follows in the tradition of rivalry, Elizabeth Costello anticipates and even challenges the gap between the text as it is reconstructed for the purposes of ethical criticism and the text...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (2): 224–239.
Published: 01 June 2020
... least a little bit believable. Kohlhaas knows that he is being played, but once the fable is put in play, it cannot be entirely discounted. No matter how vigorously the weak semblance of truthfulness of this Paßschein is debunked, more work is going to be required to take the shine off of it. When...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (1): 81–95.
Published: 01 January 2008
... mejilla, pensando lo que diría. (1. Pr. 68) Many times I picked up my pen to write it, and as many times I put it down again because I didn’t know what to say: and once when I was in the quandary, with the paper in front of me, the pen behind my ear, my elbow on the desk, and my cheek in my hand...