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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2015) 67 (1): 45–61.
Published: 01 March 2015
...William Coker This essay aims to contribute to a growing body of criticism devoted to the paradox of John Keats's peculiarly political aestheticism. Keats places a seemingly disinterested aestheticism squarely within the matrix of history, at a time when history itself was coming into its own as a...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2003) 55 (4): 293–319.
Published: 01 September 2003
...: Bellew, 1995 . 61 -108. Aske, Martin. Keats and Hellenism . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985 . Bal, Mieke. The Mottled Screen: Reading Proust Visually . Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997 . Bennett, Andrew. Keats, Narrative, and Audience . Cambridge: Cambridge University...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2013) 65 (1): 101–122.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Stanislav Shvabrin Overlooked by students of John Keats's reception in Russia and misattributed by scholars researching the earliest stages of the writer's evolution, Vladimir Nabokov's Russian domestication of “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” (1921) poses before its interpreter a set of problems ranging...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 83–85.
Published: 01 January 2001
... and David Hayman to Rilke. Cohn declares that, of all other writers, Mallarmé is closest to Keats (p. 280). However, while the delicious “possibilité féminine” of “Le Nénuphar blanc” (p. 285) may indeed recall the “unheard melodies” of Keats’s Grecian urn, Keats has none of the obscurity of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 86–87.
Published: 01 January 2001
... and David Hayman to Rilke. Cohn declares that, of all other writers, Mallarmé is closest to Keats (p. 280). However, while the delicious “possibilité féminine” of “Le Nénuphar blanc” (p. 285) may indeed recall the “unheard melodies” of Keats’s Grecian urn, Keats has none of the obscurity of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 88–90.
Published: 01 January 2001
... and David Hayman to Rilke. Cohn declares that, of all other writers, Mallarmé is closest to Keats (p. 280). However, while the delicious “possibilité féminine” of “Le Nénuphar blanc” (p. 285) may indeed recall the “unheard melodies” of Keats’s Grecian urn, Keats has none of the obscurity of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 90–93.
Published: 01 January 2001
... and David Hayman to Rilke. Cohn declares that, of all other writers, Mallarmé is closest to Keats (p. 280). However, while the delicious “possibilité féminine” of “Le Nénuphar blanc” (p. 285) may indeed recall the “unheard melodies” of Keats’s Grecian urn, Keats has none of the obscurity of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 93–96.
Published: 01 January 2001
... and David Hayman to Rilke. Cohn declares that, of all other writers, Mallarmé is closest to Keats (p. 280). However, while the delicious “possibilité féminine” of “Le Nénuphar blanc” (p. 285) may indeed recall the “unheard melodies” of Keats’s Grecian urn, Keats has none of the obscurity of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2008) 60 (3): 288–290.
Published: 01 June 2008
... Channel with a study of Mallarmé’s translation of Tennyson and Yves Bonnefoy’s translations of Shakespeare, Keats, and Yeats. In addition to chapters on Ezra Pound and Samuel Beckett, she devotes a chapter to French translations of Virginia Woolf, one of the topics of an earlier critical collection...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2008) 60 (3): 290–294.
Published: 01 June 2008
... looks back from across the Channel with a study of Mallarmé’s translation of Tennyson and Yves Bonnefoy’s translations of Shakespeare, Keats, and Yeats. In addition to chapters on Ezra Pound and Samuel Beckett, she devotes a chapter to French translations of Virginia Woolf, one of the topics of an...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2008) 60 (3): 295–297.
Published: 01 June 2008
... looks back from across the Channel with a study of Mallarmé’s translation of Tennyson and Yves Bonnefoy’s translations of Shakespeare, Keats, and Yeats. In addition to chapters on Ezra Pound and Samuel Beckett, she devotes a chapter to French translations of Virginia Woolf, one of the topics of an...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2008) 60 (3): 297–300.
Published: 01 June 2008
... Channel with a study of Mallarmé’s translation of Tennyson and Yves Bonnefoy’s translations of Shakespeare, Keats, and Yeats. In addition to chapters on Ezra Pound and Samuel Beckett, she devotes a chapter to French translations of Virginia Woolf, one of the topics of an earlier critical collection...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2002) 54 (2): 187–190.
Published: 01 March 2002
... overdetermined. In contrast to Abrams’s apparently clear account, Milner COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/194 points to Keats’s tasting of the primal feast near the beginning of The Fall of Hyperion, in which he at once reenacts the Fall (in his ingestion and swooning) and internalizes the Miltonic narrative of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2002) 54 (2): 191–193.
Published: 01 March 2002
... overdetermined. In contrast to Abrams’s apparently clear account, Milner COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/194 points to Keats’s tasting of the primal feast near the beginning of The Fall of Hyperion, in which he at once reenacts the Fall (in his ingestion and swooning) and internalizes the Miltonic narrative of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 March 2002) 54 (2): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2002
... overdetermined. In contrast to Abrams’s apparently clear account, Milner COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/194 points to Keats’s tasting of the primal feast near the beginning of The Fall of Hyperion, in which he at once reenacts the Fall (in his ingestion and swooning) and internalizes the Miltonic narrative of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2008) 60 (3): 207–227.
Published: 01 June 2008
..., with Wolfhard Steppe and Claus Melchior. Afterword by Michael Groden. London: The Bodley Head, 2002 . ____. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man . Ed. Jeri Johnson. London and New York: Oxford University Press, 2000 . Keats, John. Selected Letters . Ed. Robert Gittings. New York: Oxford...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 June 2010) 62 (3): 201–227.
Published: 01 June 2010
... Literature . Cambridge and London: The Belknap Press of Harvard UP, 1987 . 95 –114. ———. “What Is Poetry?” Selected Writings . Vol. 3 . The Hague: Mouton, 1981 . 740 –50. Joyce, James. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man . London: Jonathan Cape, 1934 . Keats, John. “La Belle Dame Sans...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 December 2011) 63 (4): 366–382.
Published: 01 December 2011
... : Macmillan , 1995 . Print . Poems of Keats . Ed. Blunden Edmund . London and Glasgow : Collins , 1955 . Print . Poems of the Second World War: The Oasis Selection . Ed. Selwyn Victor de Mauny Erik Fletcher Ian Morris Norman . London : J.M. Dent & Sons Ltd , 1985...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 September 2007) 59 (4): 315–331.
Published: 01 September 2007
... Prose . Trans. Willa and Edwin Muir. Ed. Nahum N. Glatzer. New York: Schocken, 1971 . ____. Der andere Prozeβ. Kafkas Briefe an Felice . Munich: Hanser, 1969 . Keats, John. Selected Poems and Letters . Ed. Douglas Bush. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1967 . Maar, Michael. “Curse of the First...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (1 January 2001) 53 (1): 58–82.
Published: 01 January 2001
...]ithout the notebooks, we might not have guessed that Frye thought of A Study of English Romanticism as a cycle, with Beddoes at the bottom or south (the underworld), Shelley east (the revolutionary dawn), Keats at the oracular north, and Wordsworth, who apparently got squeezed out of chapter one, as...