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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 231–243.
Published: 01 June 2009
...ANTONIO BARRENECHEA This essay locates the intellectual origins of comparative American studies in Herbert Eugene Bolton's “The Epic of Greater America” (1931). Bolton argued for a hemispheric approach to the study of history and laid the groundwork for a comparative practice with plural...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 189–208.
Published: 01 June 2009
... discipline in the U.S. and, more particularly, the recent development of the comparative study of the Americas. This growing field is variously referred to as Americas Studies, Transamerican Studies, Interamerican Studies, Hemispheric Studies and, depending upon the program or curriculum, it may also involve...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 209–219.
Published: 01 June 2009
... may be its most comparable trait. This essay explores some of the diverse symptoms and literary manifestations of this perennial hemispheric irony. University of Oregon 2009 DJELAL KADIR America’s Exceptional Comparabilities: An Instance of World...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 316–326.
Published: 01 June 2009
... Rivera's mural Pan American Unity (1939) to La ciudad ausente (1992), arguing that Piglia's blend of science fiction, literary canons, and popular culture creates a model for understanding the neobaroque tendencies of a hemispheric American literature that includes Neal Stephenson, William Gibson, Jonathan...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 335–345.
Published: 01 June 2009
...AMARYLL CHANADY This essay develops the concept of the “transamerican outcast” in order to examine the literary figure of economic exile in the Americas. This essay addresses emerging “translocalities” in the hemisphere—that is, multiple cultural networks and socially stratified global cities...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (1): 5–14.
Published: 01 March 2013
... comparative in nature, have been made since the early 1990s to reconfigure American studies beyond its established national-linguistic boundaries, either in relation to the American hemisphere or to various constructs of world literature. This essay reflects on those two mutually reinforcing processes by way...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (2): 97–118.
Published: 01 March 2007
...VLADIMIR E. ALEXANDROV University of Oregon 2007 Abernathy, Marjorie, and Jeffrey Coney. “Semantic and Phonemic Priming in the Cerebral Hemispheres.” Neuropsychologia 28 . 9 ( 1990 ): 933 -45. Alexandrov, Vladimir E. “Biology, Semiosis, and Cultural Difference in Lotman's...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (4): 389–391.
Published: 01 September 2008
... U.S. this role included opposition to growing U.S. hegemony in the hemisphere. Brickhouse writes: “While the American Renaissance of the United States proves in many cases (though, crucially, not in all of them) inseparable from imperialist sensibilities...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (4): 391–394.
Published: 01 September 2008
... decades, literature was playing a significant role in the definition of nations, and outside the U.S. this role included opposition to growing U.S. hegemony in the hemisphere. Brickhouse writes: “While the American Renaissance of the United States proves in...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (3): 199–200.
Published: 01 June 2005
.... Not to mention Igbo, Khmer, Uzbek. . . . For those who might have complained that all this was too much work, Spivak offered the following brac- ing response: “There are a few hegemonic European languages and innumer- able Southern Hemisphere languages. The only principled answer to that is ‘Too...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 49–72.
Published: 01 March 2012
... a prominent (and vexed) symbol in the nineteenth-century U.S. political and literary imaginary, the United States formed a distinct part of the “initial burgeoning of hemispheric thought within the national imagination” in Haiti as well (Brickhouse 2). Like many early American writers, early...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 274–294.
Published: 01 June 2009
..., entitled Do The Amer- icas Have a Common Literature? argued for the development of methodological approaches to study “the issue of hemispheric literary communality” as a counter- point to the radicalized versions of North-South antagonism developed both by Leopoldo Zea’s generation and by the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 275–282.
Published: 01 September 2001
... States and Global Imaginaries” shuttles between the national imaginary of the United States and the hemispheric construction of the Americas in order to question the ancient yet animate fables of republican fictions. Such deeply estab- lished academic disciplines as American and Latin American Studies...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (1): 35–42.
Published: 01 March 2014
... a case in point the emerging field of hemispheric American stud- ies, she identifies a troubling “replication of the unequal relations of power” (394) between the United States and Latin America in scholarship that purports to advance a holistic study of the American continent. She reminds us...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 373–388.
Published: 01 September 2001
... THE UNIVERSAL imaginary has withstood the test A of time. As a distant moment of discovery, a hemispheric marker, or the naming of a powerful modern nation, America’s claims to unique transcenden- tal dimensions continue to seem natural—if not necessary—to peoples, nations, and academic...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (3): 246–255.
Published: 01 June 2005
... the pragmatic level, this greater ambition (and even confidence) appears in her explicit declaration that “We must take the languages of the Southern Hemisphere as active cultural media rather than as objects of cultural study by the sanctioned ignorance of the metro- politan migrant” (Death 9).3...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (3): 220–230.
Published: 01 June 2009
... hemispheric identity: Guatemala as an American nation derived, yet distinct, from Europe. This project, which increasingly constituted his life’s work, is irreducibly comparative, a project that —unlike Meltzl’s “principle of polyglottism”— attempts to account for a history of colonialism and to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (4): 339–362.
Published: 01 September 2000
...-reaching: he intended it to provide nothing less than a semiotic explanation of how all levels of culture work every- where—from the relations between the hemispheres of the brain, to dialogue, to the production and consumption of cultural artifacts, to large scale changes in national cultures...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (4): 339–359.
Published: 01 September 2006
... people around in the world in order to build tributary economies—most notably, the transport of indentured servants and slaves—also imprinted distinguishing features on the new nations that emerged. Eventually, inhabitants in these complex immigrant nations in the Western Hemisphere would begin to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 298–314.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., Second and Third Worlds inapplicable, and it is now often replaced by talk about the global North and the global South. Roughly, the “global North” refers to the world’s highly industrialized and wealthy states, most of which are located in the northern hemisphere—though Australia and New Zealand are...