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gogol

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 161–178.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Lauren Lydic Dubravka Ugrešić's 1983 short story “Hrenovka u vrućem pecivu” (“Hot Dog on a Warm Bun”) self-consciously parodies N.V. Gogol′'s 1836 “Nos” (“The Nose”). Building on the tradition of “noseology,” a literary sub-genre in 1820s and 1830s Russia, Ugrešić parodies the highly symbolic...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (4): 370–393.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Molly Brunson In fragmented fever dreams of St. Petersburg’s cityscape and during frenzied flights on country roads, Nikolai Gogol represents imperial Russia with a unique, often disorienting descriptive prose, which has been considered both striking in its realism and protomodernist in its...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (4): 291–320.
Published: 01 September 2000
... preva- lent narrative form of the nineteenth-century fantastic, practiced by Balzac, Gogol, Hawthorne, Maupassant and Poe, among others. Pygmalionesque desires are also represented in novellas and novels, such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1817- 18), which is contemporaneous with “Der Sandmann...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 55–67.
Published: 01 January 2010
... had apparently read the French translation of Pellico's memoir in his youth, and his life-long fascination with Pushkin and Gogol, both of whom were attentive readers of Pellico, brought the works of this Italian writer into the orbit of his own literary interests. In this essay, I argue that, in all...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 137–161.
Published: 01 June 2013
... Utopian Peripheries.” The German Quarterly 80 . 2 ( 2007 ): 201 – 19 . JSTOR. Web. 4 May 2011 . Bojanowska Edyta M. Nikolai Gogol: Between Ukrainian and Russian Nationalism . Cambridge : Harvard UP , 2007 . Print . Belgum Kirsten . Popularizing the Nation: Audience...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 2–22.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Madame Bovary (1856), and Tolstoy’s “Tri smerti” (“Three Deaths,” 1859), Anna Karenina (1873-76), and “Smert’ Ivana 3 These particular images suggest the degree to which Dostoevsky’s narrative “emerges from un- der” Gogol’s “Overcoat” (“Shinel Yet Dostoevsky critically complicates Gogol’s play...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (1): 23–40.
Published: 01 March 2021
...). 9 Russian literature of the second half of the nineteenth century exhibits a growing tendency to render mood in clinical terms as nervous irritation. In 1847 Nikolay Vasilyevich Gogol wrote that the stimulating historical reality thwarted his efforts to reach the balanced mood ( nastroyeniye...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (3): 253–268.
Published: 01 September 2011
... Wade. The Eighteenth-Century English Novel in French Translation, A Bibliographical Study. New York: Publications of the Institute of French Studies, Inc., 1936. Print. Striedter, Jurij. Der Schelmenroman in Russland: Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Russischen Romans vor Gogol’. Berlin...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (3): 228–245.
Published: 01 June 2010
...: A Study of Dostoevsky in Relation to Balzac, Dickens, and Gogol. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1965. Frank, Joseph. Dostoevsky: The Miraculous Years 1865–1871. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1995. Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von. Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship. Ed. and trans. Eric A. Blackall. Prince­ ton...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (4): 394–412.
Published: 01 December 2017
... this ambivalence by foregrounding emigrants’ relationships to abandoned and adopted local spaces, including cities, buildings, and kitchens in communal apartments, such as the one where Sasha once watched her father “[squish] a bucket of sauerkraut with a Complete Biography of Gogol wrapped in cellophane...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 January 2000
... Dvojnik ”). Chapter 5 of Evoliutsiia russkogo naturalizma: Gogol' i Dostoevskij . Leningrad: Akademia, 1929 . 206 -90. Zelinskij, V.A. Istoriko-kriticheskij kommentarij k sochineniiam F.M. Dostoevskogo . 3 vols. Tip. T. Malinskago, 1885 -86. MADNESS AND FREE...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 122–143.
Published: 01 March 2010
... of Udolpho (1794). 3 The corpus of nineteenth-century portrait stories is fairly large; a list of some of the better known stories might include Gautier, “La Cafetière”; Gogol, “The Portait”; Hawthorne, “The Prophetic Pic- tures”; Hoffmann, “Der Arthushof”; James, “The Liar”; Poe, “The Oval Portrait...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (3): 262–282.
Published: 01 June 2010
..., including E.T.A Hoffmann, Edgar Allen Poe, Nikolai Gogol, and Charles Dickens. In 1919 Freud removed this notion of the uncanny from the urban space of the industrial city and placed it resolutely in the interior space of the human psyche. What is radical about Rilke’s 1 More recently, the field...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (2): 225–227.
Published: 01 June 2011
... reevaluation. On occasion, Meyer’s use of the term “Romantic” is even accompanied by such modifiers as “innocent” or “naïve” (65). The book’s opening chap- ter on Pushkin and Gogol and their move —​via the French subtexts —​away from poetry toward prose and away from Romanticism toward realism harbors...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (2): 227–230.
Published: 01 June 2011
... reevaluation. On occasion, Meyer’s use of the term “Romantic” is even accompanied by such modifiers as “innocent” or “naïve” (65). The book’s opening chap- ter on Pushkin and Gogol and their move —​via the French subtexts —​away from poetry toward prose and away from Romanticism toward realism harbors...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (2): 230–234.
Published: 01 June 2011
... reevaluation. On occasion, Meyer’s use of the term “Romantic” is even accompanied by such modifiers as “innocent” or “naïve” (65). The book’s opening chap- ter on Pushkin and Gogol and their move —​via the French subtexts —​away from poetry toward prose and away from Romanticism toward realism harbors...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (4): 459–480.
Published: 01 December 2014
...” (36). Indeed, placing himself at the frontier between the body afflicted by madness and the text dynamized by, surrendered to, mimetic appropriation, Uno wonders aloud, “There is also the fact that I have read too much Gogol” (Hirotsu, “Ano jidai” 49).17 Does this not amount...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (4): 300–316.
Published: 01 September 2004
... scelta di opere di autori stranieri. Tra queste risaltano i romanzi e i racconti di Dostojevskij, Tolstoj, Gogol, Cècov, Puskin, Turgenev; quelli di Zola, Gautier, Balzac, Flaubert, Maupassant, Stendhal; le poesie di Laforgue, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Rodenbach, Verlaine, Valéry, Rilke; gli scritti di...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (4): 315–331.
Published: 01 September 2007
... the Singer,” the dog of “The Investigations of a Dog,” and the other enigmatic creatures in Kafka’s works, all express a longing for “a free and natural life.” At the outset of his lecture, Nabokov links The Metamorphosis with Gogol’s “The Overcoat” and distinguishes the two from Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (1): 54–68.
Published: 01 January 2009
... the Freudian method of verbal association (397–99). For further discussion see Field 263, and Black- well 132–33. 6 See Naiman 47n.91. Soviet attitudes toward Freud were mixed, if not uneasy. In the mid-1920s psychoanalytic studies of Pushkin and Gogol appeared (see Ermakov). Iolan Neufeld’s psychoana...