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dystopia

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 19–31.
Published: 01 March 2020
...Gil Hochberg Abstract This article is about a recent wave of literary dystopias published in Israel, most of which center on the soon-to-come destruction of the Jewish state. Notable among these are The Third ( Ha-shlishi ) by Yishai Sarid (2015), Mud ( Tit ) by Dror Burstein (2016), and Nuntia...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (1): 60–71.
Published: 01 March 2018
...Elana Gomel; Vered Karti Shemtov This article analyzes a new form of historical representation that we term “limbotopia” (by analogy with utopia and dystopia). Limbotopia is a genre of the “broad present,” in which history seems to come to a standstill and characters inhabit a changeless—and often...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 68–82.
Published: 01 March 2020
... . And Daniele Fiorettti has a lifeless detail from the famous Renaissance painting of an “Ideal City” for his Utopia and Dystopia in Postwar Italian Literature: Pasolini, Calvino, Sanguineti, Volponi . This sample suggests, again, that postwar Europe is primarily understood as melancholy, disengaged...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 55–67.
Published: 01 January 2010
... the court rather than be his jailer, and by Rodion, who soon metamorphoses into the prison director Rodrig (40 and 44, respectively). But, unlike Pellico’s guards, Roman and Rodion are unarmed, and Cincinnatus is not positioned between them but walks behind — presumably because in Nabokov’s dystopia...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (4): 416–431.
Published: 01 September 2009
... remains sadly obedient to the old world: black is the absence of color, the fragmentary is that which is not whole, the asymmetrical is that which is not symmetrical. The setting of Comment c’est  moves between what could be called the utopia and the dystopia of mud. The mud at first seems...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 256–259.
Published: 01 June 2006
... and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work again in the real world—allows for a complex discussion of these writers’ reac- tions to and analyses of radically different...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 259–261.
Published: 01 June 2006
... and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work again in the real world—allows for a complex discussion of these writers’ reac- tions to and analyses of radically different...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 261–263.
Published: 01 June 2006
... and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work again in the real world—allows for a complex discussion of these writers’ reac- tions to and analyses of radically different...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 263–265.
Published: 01 June 2006
... and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work again in the real world—allows for a complex discussion of these writers’ reac- tions to and analyses of radically different...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (1): 27–41.
Published: 01 January 2001
... to recall Orwell’s dystopia. In Swift’s satire, this is not the case: Gulliver has as much con- trol over his narrative as does the shipwrecked sailor in Robinson Crusoe, the only difference being that whereas Defoe has his narrator (re-)create a mimetic illu- sionistic world in the form of a travel...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 315–332.
Published: 01 September 2001
... of utopia as multilaterally imagined and as an ongoing radical difference from itself, we now entertain utopia as the uni- polar uniperspectival valorization of the temporality of “techno-capital.” If the creation of violent dystopias during times when marxism-communism degener- ated into Stalinist...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (3): i–xxvi.
Published: 01 June 2003
... that were occurring as she grew up. At that point in her life, trying to make sense of her radically disorienting experiences, Rigoberta Menchú presented Burgos-Debray with a shifting and unstable cultural history, part Rousseauian idyll, part Manichean dystopia, in which unchanging ancestral wisdom...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (3): 229–245.
Published: 01 June 2003
..., either from personal experiences or out of the need to legitimate their permanent aban- donment of the ancestral land, describe the old China to their American-born children as a sort of dystopia, uninhabitable especially for women. We find such parents, for instance, in Jade Snow Wong’s Fifth...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2023) 75 (2): 153–171.
Published: 01 June 2023
... relatively less European Moscow hosts. The four dormitory novels use different literary styles, from claustrophobic dystopia to madcap picaresque, and also dramatize four different historical periods: Hikmet’s book is set in 1924, a phase of sincere if not always successful multiethnic internationalism...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2024) 76 (1): 86–104.
Published: 01 March 2024
... responses in her imagined dystopia ( Sarraute 8, 9 ). In his 1961 article “Nouveau roman, nouveau homme,” Robbe-Grillet pinpoints two attack lines of the hostile press: the New Novel wants to chase humankind from the world, and the New Novel aims at a perfect objectivity ( Pour un nouveau roman 114...