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dystopia

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 19–31.
Published: 01 March 2020
...Gil Hochberg Abstract This article is about a recent wave of literary dystopias published in Israel, most of which center on the soon-to-come destruction of the Jewish state. Notable among these are The Third ( Ha-shlishi ) by Yishai Sarid (2015), Mud ( Tit ) by Dror Burstein (2016), and Nuntia...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (1): 60–71.
Published: 01 March 2018
...Elana Gomel; Vered Karti Shemtov This article analyzes a new form of historical representation that we term “limbotopia” (by analogy with utopia and dystopia). Limbotopia is a genre of the “broad present,” in which history seems to come to a standstill and characters inhabit a changeless—and often...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (4): 416–431.
Published: 01 September 2009
... of Comment c’est  moves between what could be called the utopia and the dystopia of mud. The mud at first seems to represent the “womb” of the mother/ earth, rich in nutrients: “the tongue comes out lolls in the mud that lasts a good moment they are good moments perhaps the best difficult to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 55–67.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Rodion are unarmed, and Cincinnatus is not positioned between them but walks behind — presumably because in Nabokov’s dystopia there is no escape from the surrounding world. The title of Nabokov’s novel alludes to Carl Maria von Weber’s Invitation to the Dance (Aufforderung zum Tanz, 1819) to...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 68–82.
Published: 01 March 2020
... Renaissance painting of an “Ideal City” for his Utopia and Dystopia in Postwar Italian Literature: Pasolini, Calvino, Sanguineti, Volponi . This sample suggests, again, that postwar Europe is primarily understood as melancholy, disengaged, and dystopic. 4 It seems to be no coincidence that like...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 256–259.
Published: 01 June 2006
... earlier centuries by Alexis de Tocqueville and the marquis de Custine. Here, focusing on the semiotic aspects of utopias and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 259–261.
Published: 01 June 2006
... the semiotic aspects of utopias and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work again in the real world—allows for a complex discussion of these writers’ reac- tions...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 261–263.
Published: 01 June 2006
... and Baudrillard’s Amérique, as well as works from earlier centuries by Alexis de Tocqueville and the marquis de Custine. Here, focusing on the semiotic aspects of utopias and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (3): 263–265.
Published: 01 June 2006
... the semiotic aspects of utopias and dystopias—the utopian potential to separate signs from objects in the real world and explore new concepts, and the dystopian difficulty of putting those signs back to work again in the real world—allows for a complex discussion of these writers’ reac- tions...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (1): 27–41.
Published: 01 January 2001
... by the politician punisher. Ultimately, the narrator seems to have been forced to relinquish his narrative to his captors and punishers—to the “Big Men,” as they say in Nigeria, or to “Big Brother,” if we wish to recall Orwell’s dystopia. In Swift’s satire, this is not the case: Gulliver has as...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (3): i–xxvi.
Published: 01 June 2003
... experiences, Rigoberta Menchú presented Burgos-Debray with a shifting and unstable cultural history, part Rousseauian idyll, part Manichean dystopia, in which unchanging ancestral wisdom is constantly opposed to the oppressive demands of the encroaching mixed-race ladinos, whose culture is diametrically...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 315–332.
Published: 01 September 2001
... from itself, we now entertain utopia as the uni- polar uniperspectival valorization of the temporality of “techno-capital.” If the creation of violent dystopias during times when marxism-communism degener- ated into Stalinist statism had to do with the brutalization of the present in the name of...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (3): 229–245.
Published: 01 June 2003
... uncommon that Chinese immigrants, either from personal experiences or out of the need to legitimate their permanent aban- donment of the ancestral land, describe the old China to their American-born children as a sort of dystopia, uninhabitable especially for women. We find such parents, for instance...