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dissonance

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (3): 241–256.
Published: 01 September 2012
..., with ten elements that define and structure it as a highly complex literary form: length, encyclopedic mode, dissonant chorality, diegetic exuberance, completeness, narrratorial omniscience, paranoid imagination, inter-semiocity, ethical commitment, and hybrid realism. These ten categories are common...
Image
Published: 01 December 2018
Figure 1. Bars 1–7 from O Mirtillo, Mirtillo anima mia , Claudio Monteverdi, Fifth Book of Madrigals (1605). Monteverdi’s idiomatic use of unprepared dissonance is highlighted. The beginning of this madrigal stood at the center of the controversy with Artusi. Figure 1. Bars 1–7 from O More
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 369–391.
Published: 01 December 2018
...Figure 1. Bars 1–7 from O Mirtillo, Mirtillo anima mia , Claudio Monteverdi, Fifth Book of Madrigals (1605). Monteverdi’s idiomatic use of unprepared dissonance is highlighted. The beginning of this madrigal stood at the center of the controversy with Artusi. Figure 1. Bars 1–7 from O...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (1): 52–70.
Published: 01 March 2014
....” First, skepticism in Wittgenstein's later work resembles dissonance in one of Beethoven's most profoundly historical works, Symphony No. 3 in E flat “Eroica.” Second, and by extension, the overall structure of argumentation in Part 1 of Philosophical Investigations resembles Beethoven's version...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 208–226.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Twentieth-Century Experiments in Form: A Critical Re-reading of Cecilia Vicuña’s Indigenism as Episteme Dissonance is beauty. The history of the social struggles of Chile, from pre...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 170–172.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 172–174.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 175–176.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 177–178.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 178–180.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 181–182.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 183–185.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 185–188.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 189–192.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., is seen as the figure ironically organizing or compos- ing the objective contradictions of his existence and allowing such “dissonances” (Lukács’s word) to be interpreted harmoniously, and in epic fashion, as reflecting a totality (p. 18). COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/182 Thus Lukács’s use of musical...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 182–199.
Published: 01 June 2013
... a serialism that refuses to accord dominance to any pre-emptive culminating argument —​a practice that should remind us of the value Adorno sees in “the new music”: not insisting on crowning every dissonant moment with a comforting harmonious conclusion. Adorno uses similar techniques in his work...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (3): 325–330.
Published: 01 September 2012
... in such a way as to exploit without eradicating their differences. To put it another way, the con- tent of the close-fitting construction that harmonia typically designates is proximity, con- tact, and productive dissonance, rather than a single, stable formal characteristic. And this proximity, contact...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (3): 330–334.
Published: 01 September 2012
... in such a way as to exploit without eradicating their differences. To put it another way, the con- tent of the close-fitting construction that harmonia typically designates is proximity, con- tact, and productive dissonance, rather than a single, stable formal characteristic. And this proximity, contact...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (3): 334–337.
Published: 01 September 2012
... juxtapositions between different arts in such a way as to exploit without eradicating their differences. To put it another way, the con- tent of the close-fitting construction that harmonia typically designates is proximity, con- tact, and productive dissonance, rather than a single, stable formal...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (1): 54–76.
Published: 01 January 2004
... to be no dissonance between what Simon presents as “the value and intention of the text in its time and contemporary perceptions” (35). Yet, in fact, while both the author and the translator allegedly commit themselves to foregrounding the role of female subjectivity in the production of meaning, a dissonance...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (1): 77–98.
Published: 01 January 2004
... of fragments of Western tradition, an incorpo- ration that in the best tales emphasizes dissonance and a lack of closure, and in the worst, a narcissistic preoccupation with the airless harmonies of aestheticism or what Arendt calls the German tradition of Bildung. For Arendt, Dinesen’s early tale...