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disgust

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (4): 361–376.
Published: 01 December 2020
... object of what the author terms the erotics of disgust. Chughtai is perhaps most famous for her being tried for obscenity in 1942 for her most famous short story, “The Quilt” (“Lihaaf”), which narrates a young girl’s encounter with the erotic relationship of a middle-class Muslim woman and her female...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (3): 229–241.
Published: 01 June 2002
... of Coriolanus’s spitting out his words with disgust, as though they were foreign particles to be gotten rid of, also suggests an infection or con- 4 In his study of Coriolanus, Bertolt Brecht suggests that this stasis of character, this unchanging, unbuilding figure within the play, may have been entirely...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (2): 151–169.
Published: 01 March 2001
... his tall ears wypoczywa w cieniu tego krzyku he reposes in its shadow wstrza˛sany dreszczem obrzydzenia with a shudder of disgust Apollo czy´sci swój instrument Apollo cleans his instrument tylko z pozoru only seemingly gl/os...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (2): 158–177.
Published: 01 March 2005
..., drawing us further into “the place where meaning collapses,” “the divisible, foldable, and catastrophic space” in which the outcast dwells (Powers 2, 8). If, as Kristeva suggests, fear and disgust best describe the reaction of the sub- ject upon encountering the abject—“fearfully it turns away...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (3): 345–362.
Published: 01 September 2013
... no affinity to the actual adherents of Hasidism. Despite Kron’s feelings of disgust, however, he acknowledges his connection to Yiddish-speaking Eastern European Jewry. He recalls growing up in a Rus- sian-speaking assimilated Jewish household in Bobroisk, “on a quiet, beautiful street surrounded...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (2): 194–217.
Published: 01 June 2018
... into not-infrequently violent, disgust-filled meta-reflections on writing and literature, as well as (sometimes crude, sometimes lyrical and aphoristic) reflections on ontology. Only by doing drastic violence to Boris’s own words can the narrator salvage something like a conventional narrative. Le Sang du ciel thus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2015) 67 (2): 207–227.
Published: 01 June 2015
... bit my fist in pain and disgust. He got back up. (Réjouis 244) Vieux-Chauvet is relentless in this description of a horrific sexual encounter. Rose later connects this sickening act with death itself: Pourtant, je me sentais comme purifiée. Lorsque j’en aurai fini avec cette torture, j’aurai...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (4): 291–320.
Published: 01 September 2000
... forger des simulacres humains?—Ah! ah! ah!—ah “Those unlucky fellows, for lack of adequate means of execution, produced only derisory monsters . . . Their automata deserve a place in the most hideous waxworks museum because they are disgusting objects . . . These mannequins are nothing...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (2): 155–180.
Published: 01 June 2016
... and disgusted. He scours the room in search of additional interlopers and lovers, declaring “och, ik voel d’onlesselijke brandt/ Uws wulpze mins” (B8r; Oh, I feel the unquenchable fire of your lecherous lust!) and castigates Plancina: “Eerlooze keizersboel, de naam van moeder is/ Verwaarloost door uw...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (2): 149–172.
Published: 01 June 2014
... experiences or inclinations. In one of the earliest reviews, Valentim Magalhães called it “imundo” (filthy) and “ascoroso” (disgusting) because, accord- ing to him, it dealt with “um ramo de pornografia até hoje inédito por inabordável, por antinatural, por ignóbil” (Notícia, 19 Nov. 1895, qtd. in Howes...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (4): 377–405.
Published: 01 December 2020
... to imagine a serene balcony a few steps away, facing the west, and, below, marble and laurels and a garden whose various levels are duplicated in a rectangle of water. A woman has placed in a goblet a yellow rose. The man murmurs the inevitable lines that now, to tell the truth, already disgusted [ hastían...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 352–353.
Published: 01 September 2005
... discusses, our ability to feel happi- ness, anger, disgust, fear, and sadness (directly and vicariously) is so powerful that such emotions can override reasoning. For instance, if we are about to be attacked, we don’t contemplate running we simply run, and we experience this same process when watch...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 354–355.
Published: 01 September 2005
... discusses, our ability to feel happi- ness, anger, disgust, fear, and sadness (directly and vicariously) is so powerful that such emotions can override reasoning. For instance, if we are about to be attacked, we don’t contemplate running we simply run, and we experience this same process when watch...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 356–358.
Published: 01 September 2005
... with a given film, COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/358 fictional narrative, or musical composition. As Hogan discusses, our ability to feel happi- ness, anger, disgust, fear, and sadness (directly and vicariously) is so powerful that such emotions can override reasoning. For instance, if we are about...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 359–361.
Published: 01 September 2005
... discusses, our ability to feel happi- ness, anger, disgust, fear, and sadness (directly and vicariously) is so powerful that such emotions can override reasoning. For instance, if we are about to be attacked, we don’t contemplate running we simply run, and we experience this same process when watch...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 362–364.
Published: 01 September 2005
... with a given film, COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/358 fictional narrative, or musical composition. As Hogan discusses, our ability to feel happi- ness, anger, disgust, fear, and sadness (directly and vicariously) is so powerful that such emotions can override reasoning. For instance, if we are about...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (2): 97–127.
Published: 01 March 2009
... man — and recoils from him in fear and disgust. The poem’s “Byronic” narrative comes to an end, and the narrative leaps from 1709 to 1828. And yet, as I mentioned earlier, the last word in the poem belongs not to the imperial bard who glorifi es Peter’s legacy, but rather to the elegist who...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 408–425.
Published: 01 December 2018
... Man did not see this clearly, he nonetheless experienced it strongly. For one senses in his reading of the constellation figure a discomfort, if not a disgust, whose origin must lie deeper than an individual poet’s alleged denial of the necessary discrepancy between formal structures and semantic...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (4): 317–330.
Published: 01 September 2004
... and ends attached to its (ostensible) end. These “Addenda” are accompanied by a footnote declaring that “The following precious and illuminating material should be carefully stud- ied. Only fatigue and disgust prevented its incorporation” (Watt 247). In the case of The Castle, this task of carefully...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (4): 362–364.
Published: 01 September 2004
... and exploitation. This common experience meant two things. First, Eastern European writ- ers after 1945 had a highly sensitized social conscience and were easily politicized. Some felt acute national pride, others an acute disgust at being forced to forego a normal private life, but few important writers were...