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anticolonial movement

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (4): 455–458.
Published: 01 December 2019
... but an explanation of how the little magazine’s form —its versatility and malleability, its material underpinnings and manifestations, its affordances and advantages—made it amenable to new literary movements as diverse as surrealism in France, Bengali cultural nationalism in Calcutta, and anticolonial movement...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (4): 361–376.
Published: 01 December 2020
... a poignantly aimed critique at the exotification of this artistic project, one that characterized, in Chughtai’s opinion, many of the works of her own male friends and comrades within the Marxist anticolonial movements of her time. The artist’s inability to discipline his subaltern subject, to manage...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2022
... rather than timeless forms. adamspanos@gmail.edu Copyright © 2022 by University of Oregon 2022 internationalism anticolonial movement Aimé Césaire Cahier d’un retour au pays natal postcolonial literature AT THE CLIMACTIC moment of his epic poem Cahier d’un retour au pays natal...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2017) 69 (2): 201–221.
Published: 01 June 2017
... colonization of Korea in 1910, the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Revolution in 1917, and the anticolonial March First Movement of 1919, the Korean intelligentsia had become attracted to Soviet-led revolutionary thoughts, “whose collectivist and anti-imperialist values were consonant with the spirit...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (2): 123–138.
Published: 01 June 2019
... of the independence movement, such as Nnamdi Azikiwe, who popularized the idea of US universities as anticolonial alternatives to their British counterparts. As James Gibbs puts it in his overview of Wole Soyinka’s early encounters with US institutions, Speeches by high-profile nationalists such as Namidi [ sic...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (4): 404–426.
Published: 01 December 2022
... and a globally discursive locus of anticolonialism—what he later calls the “rendez-vous de la conquête” (“convocation of conquest”). tag2160@columbia.edu Copyright © 2022 by University of Oregon 2022 Caribbean negritude cartography lyric apostrophe Je crois beaucoup à ces choses-là et...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 110–112.
Published: 01 March 2012
... knotted together by ambivalent forces of desire, identification, memory, and forgetting”; the nation’s “psychic locale [is] that incessant movement between distinct spaces, times, and attachments through which national identification (and dis- identification) comes into being” (xvii-xviii). Readers...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 112–115.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., and forgetting”; the nation’s “psychic locale [is] that incessant movement between distinct spaces, times, and attachments through which national identification (and dis- identification) comes into being” (xvii-xviii). Readers weary of psychoanalysis, suspicious of its universalist claims and mindful...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., identification, memory, and forgetting”; the nation’s “psychic locale [is] that incessant movement between distinct spaces, times, and attachments through which national identification (and dis- identification) comes into being” (xvii-xviii). Readers weary of psychoanalysis, suspicious of its universalist...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2012) 64 (1): 117–119.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., identification, memory, and forgetting”; the nation’s “psychic locale [is] that incessant movement between distinct spaces, times, and attachments through which national identification (and dis- identification) comes into being” (xvii-xviii). Readers weary of psychoanalysis, suspicious of its universalist...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (4): 498–501.
Published: 01 December 2022
... ), and the massacre of “Muslim” anticolonial protesters in Paris in October 1961, at the time of the Eichmann trial—where the camp survivor and author Yechiel Dinur “referred to the ‘Muselmänner’ of Auschwitz just before fainting in the courtroom” (44). The capaciousness of the term memory as backdrop to this sort...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (4): 385–402.
Published: 01 December 2021
... by the Negritudinist press Présence Africaine and first published in 1963, Farrington’s translation was required reading for the Black Panthers and an entire generation of anticolonial and antiracist activists in Africa and beyond. Her use of a racial category that is legible to readers of Fanon across Britain’s...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 144–146.
Published: 01 March 2022
... of the cultural field in the formerly colonial countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America as “an emancipatory supranational movement on these continents seeking not only national independence, but also the formation of socially just societies” (5). The monograph charts the developments of literary and cinematic...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2021) 73 (2): 184–208.
Published: 01 June 2021
...). Intermittently, where this dialectical image begins to be realized, these sites have erupted in acts of de-monumentalization by anticolonial and alter-globalization activists. The article locates fragments of this dialectical image in seaports including Rotterdam, Baltimore, Barcelona, Long Beach, and Genoa...
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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (4): 448–470.
Published: 01 December 2022
... ( 1889–1919 ) and Third International (1919–1943), and second, the global anticolonial movement that formally began at the Pan-African Conference in London in 1900 but by 1926 had become a many-headed Hydra of Asian, Arab, African, and African American activists, ambitions, and programs for national self...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (4): 399–419.
Published: 01 September 2010
..., A History  1991; 1995; 2005). But in the wake of globalization and the rise of various social movements in India, such nationalis- tic literary projects have come under attack for replicating the exclusionary ges- tures of both colonialist and anticolonial nationalist historiography, as well...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (2): 116–129.
Published: 01 June 2016
... to underscore their political and intellectual distance from its conventional modes, these approaches typically seek a regrounding in the radical thought of anticolonialism and/or Third Worldist revolutionary movements in the U.S. (see, for example, Seigel). On the other hand, this forum contemplates...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2014) 66 (3): 365–368.
Published: 01 September 2014
...” with the actual business of “convert- ing to a Mahometan” [11]; there are a few other occasions when the desire to make an arrestingly bold claim leads to overstatement, and I think that Garcia is sometimes too insistent that the writers he discusses are straightforwardly “anticolonial” in their politics...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (4): 429–449.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Identity.” American Literary History 9 . 2 ( 1997 ): 350 – 63 . Print . Schacht Miriam . “‘Movement Must Be Emulated by the People’: Rootedness, Migration, and Indigenous Internationalism in Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead.” Studies in American Indian Literature 21 . 4...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (3): 273–288.
Published: 01 September 2022
..., a flash of a forgotten fact about the Naga insurgency, a violent refusal by the people to be incorporated into the just-birthed postcolonial nation. But when compared to my knowledge of the Partition of India in 1947; the Naxalite insurgencies; the Khalistan movement; and of course the military tyranny...