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analyst

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (1): 90–93.
Published: 01 January 2007
... is through the analytic patient, or analysand, experiencing the analyst as embodying his or her otherwise unconscious hallucinations and fantasies. Freud called this transference. Some analysands may actually seek to force their analysts to personify their hallucinations and fantasies. For example...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2007) 59 (1): 93–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., or analysand, experiencing the analyst as embodying his or her otherwise unconscious hallucinations and fantasies. Freud called this transference. Some analysands may actually seek to force their analysts to personify their hallucinations and fantasies. For example, Joan Riviere, whose letters Jacobus...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2009) 61 (1): 54–68.
Published: 01 January 2009
... editor in Lolita), analyst Dr. Rosetta Stone from Pnin, and the chief psychiatrist at the “Psykitsch” asylum in Ada (Dr. Sig Heiler)— these are some of the costumes in which Nabokov cloaks his “favorite fi gure of fun.” Not only did Nabokov deny any Freudian infl uence on his novels, but he also ada...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 438–447.
Published: 01 December 2011
... and its ongoing adaptations. Another advantage of media theory for the literary analyst is that every media object is conceived of as part of a circuit. The film star cannot be separated from the channels of communication that make celebrity possible, nor can the film star’s fangroup. The reader...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 70–73.
Published: 01 January 2006
... for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers to historicize, Freud tended to elide the issue of Jewishness. Little Hans, for example, makes no mention...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 77–79.
Published: 01 January 2006
... is variously figured as Yahweh, Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 80–83.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers to historicize, Freud...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 83–86.
Published: 01 January 2006
... figured as Yahweh, Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 86–89.
Published: 01 January 2006
... is variously figured as Yahweh, Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 89–90.
Published: 01 January 2006
... taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers to historicize, Freud tended to elide the issue of Jewishness. Little Hans...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 90–92.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers to historicize, Freud...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 93.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers to historicize, Freud...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (4): 376–386.
Published: 01 September 2006
... (Spiridon, Les dilemmes 87-88)—the great majority of the profes- sional analysts of his literature assimilated Istrati to a “poor Scheherazade,” symbol of an orientalism both destructive of and dangerous to the national effort to build a genuine European and Occidental culture in Romania. Vesna...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 74–77.
Published: 01 January 2006
... is variously figured as Yahweh, Christ, Judas, and Pope—in no way prevents him from taking Freud to task for eliding his own Jewishness. Object relations theory demands that the analyst be embodied, fully present in the uniqueness of his or her subjectivity, but for reasons that Rudnytsky never bothers...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 53–67.
Published: 01 March 2020
... teasing at the edges of intelligibility. In D. W. Winnicott’s “squiggle game,” child and analyst take turns tracing a spontaneous line drawing, or “squiggle,” which the other player then articulates into a recognizable image. The game encourages the reading of narrative from random forms, purporting...
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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2000) 52 (3): 213–227.
Published: 01 June 2000
..., Strich followed the lead of Elster and other turn-of-the- century analysts in examining the interrelationship between “Weltliteratur und vergleichende Literaturgeschichte” (World Literature and Comparative Literary History) in an essay with the same title, published in 1930. At the outset...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (2): 177–185.
Published: 01 March 2003
...., ideal ego as he terms it. Hypnosis thus is equated with the relation of transference between analysant and analyst, where the latter not only typifies the ego ideal, but also serves as an identificatory mirror for the imagi- nary appearance of the former’s ideal ego. In pathological fascination...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2003) 55 (2): 185–190.
Published: 01 March 2003
... of transference between analysant and analyst, where the latter not only typifies the ego ideal, but also serves as an identificatory mirror for the imagi- nary appearance of the former’s ideal ego. In pathological fascination for his ideal ego, the analysant falls short of recognizing the covered up immitance...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (1): 58–73.
Published: 01 January 2008
... missed. (Satô 20) On another quiet night she reads the Tale of Genji: Who is this woman who took up her red lacquer brush to paint life and for a thousand years has enchanted the hearts of her readers? Because yes: this analyst of subtleties is a woman...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (4): 426–441.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Class,” a forerunner of the Ehrenreichs’ “professional-managerial class” and Robert Reich’s “symbolic analysts,” as encouraging “a cosmopolitan identity, transcending national limits and enhancing their autonomy from local elites” (2).2 With its peculiar ability to produce bonds among detached...