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Resurrection

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (3): 296–311.
Published: 01 September 2016
... 1880s he engaged in a virtually unknown polemic with Mechnikov about science and religion that culminated in a face-to-face meeting the year before Tolstoy's death. Despite Tolstoy's expressed disdain for Mechnikov's theories, in his final novel, Resurrection (1899), Tolstoy used Mechnikov's phagocytic...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2020) 72 (1): 83–102.
Published: 01 March 2020
... resurrected”; literature opens aesthetics to that which had been constitutively excluded at its founding moment. The clarifying powers of the poet-aesthetician are replaced by passive “fascination” and a “passion of the image” that delimits a radically different, countercosmic, and thus utopian space...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 392–407.
Published: 01 December 2018
... he sees and is irremediably devastated by his experience. For Dostoevsky, then, the Christian notion of resurrection coincides closely with the development of the ability to recover and redeem lost memory; to journey inward, to find and revive the rotting corpse within the psyche, also means...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 89–92.
Published: 01 January 2010
... writing and life between 1914 and 1923. Estrangement is at the heart of Tolstoy’s novel Resurrection, a title echoed in Shklovsky’s “Resurrection of the Word” (1914). Nicolai Fed- erov’s proposed “resurrection of the dead” attracted Russian God-seekers and Gorky, Lunacharsky, and Mayakovsky...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 92–95.
Published: 01 January 2010
... is at the heart of Tolstoy’s novel Resurrection, a title echoed in Shklovsky’s “Resurrection of the Word” (1914). Nicolai Fed- erov’s proposed “resurrection of the dead” attracted Russian God-seekers and Gorky, Lunacharsky, and Mayakovsky. Shklovsky’s more modest proposal was to “restore to man...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 95–98.
Published: 01 January 2010
... a wonderful synopsis of Shklovsky’s writing and life between 1914 and 1923. Estrangement is at the heart of Tolstoy’s novel Resurrection, a title echoed in Shklovsky’s “Resurrection of the Word” (1914). Nicolai Fed- erov’s proposed “resurrection of the dead” attracted Russian God-seekers and Gorky...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 99–100.
Published: 01 January 2010
... is at the heart of Tolstoy’s novel Resurrection, a title echoed in Shklovsky’s “Resurrection of the Word” (1914). Nicolai Fed- erov’s proposed “resurrection of the dead” attracted Russian God-seekers and Gorky, Lunacharsky, and Mayakovsky. Shklovsky’s more modest proposal was to “restore to man...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (1): 100–102.
Published: 01 January 2010
... of Shklovsky’s writing and life between 1914 and 1923. Estrangement is at the heart of Tolstoy’s novel Resurrection, a title echoed in Shklovsky’s “Resurrection of the Word” (1914). Nicolai Fed- erov’s proposed “resurrection of the dead” attracted Russian God-seekers and Gorky, Lunacharsky, and Mayakovsky...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2004) 56 (1): 23–53.
Published: 01 January 2004
..., messengers of the new Resurrection, became passionate friends in the course of Ge’s work on his famous portrait of Tolstoy. The portrait, fin- ished in the Moscow home of the writer in 1884, also terminated Ge’s enforced period of withdrawal from religious painting. Perhaps Tolstoy encouraged Ge’s...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (2): 200–219.
Published: 01 June 2013
... of the deceased culminates in the unexpected appearance of barely intelligible facial close-ups on the walls of the Palestinian sisters’ dark crypt-like room. Centrally located in the story, this scene, together with the final “resurrection” scene, corresponds ironically to Barthes’s discovery...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (1): 95–99.
Published: 01 March 2018
...- tion—Kuzmic notes parallel shifts in both heroine and nation. War and Peace depicts a fully Russian heroine, Natasha, who must be saved from the Francophile Anatole Kuragin, just as Russia herself must be defended from the French. Tolstoy returned to fiction and wrote Resurrection to help...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2001) 53 (3): 214–232.
Published: 01 June 2001
... a conflation of Enlight- enment and myth would have been, for even if nature itself was perhaps created solely for the appearance of such a “great and priceless being” as Christ, the myth of his resurrection must vanish under the Enlightenment’s ever more pen- etrating gaze into the laws of nature. Just...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 78–83.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Bolivia . La Paz: Plural Editores, 1998 . Hanssen, Beatrice. Walter Benjamin's Other History: Of Stones, Animals, Human Beings, and Angels . Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998 . Laclau, Ernesto. “The Death and Resurrection of the Theory of Ideology.” Modern Language Notes 112...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (1): 24–43.
Published: 01 January 2006
... of resurrection. Pforr’s Maria thus possesses the more “heavenly” aspects of the Madonna. While the Overbeck figure’s entry into Sulamith’s gar- den bespeaks Pforr’s prophesy of love and life for his friend, Pforr’s own worldly future is more fleeting. For, according to William Vaughan, Pforr’s access to his...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2016) 68 (3): 359–361.
Published: 01 September 2016
... satirizes sacred beliefs of Christianity such as the Holy Spirit, Holy Communion, and Christ’s Resurrection. After a brief digression into the historical context of conversos that includes definitions of limpieza de sangre and honor, Zepp describes what she calls “an emblematics of affiliation...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 72–75.
Published: 01 January 2002
... figures currently associated with the anachronistic “resurrection” of the term, Slavoj Zizek and Ernesto Laclau. Cohen’s attempt to read Zizek’s theory of ideology as a “generative matrix” in terms of Derrida’s idea of the matrix or “Khora” (p. 17) is, I believe, a bit misled, and Cohen himself ends...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 76–78.
Published: 01 January 2002
... figures currently associated with the anachronistic “resurrection” of the term, Slavoj Zizek and Ernesto Laclau. Cohen’s attempt to read Zizek’s theory of ideology as a “generative matrix” in terms of Derrida’s idea of the matrix or “Khora” (p. 17) is, I believe, a bit misled, and Cohen himself ends...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 84–87.
Published: 01 January 2002
... figures currently associated with the anachronistic “resurrection” of the term, Slavoj Zizek and Ernesto Laclau. Cohen’s attempt to read Zizek’s theory of ideology as a “generative matrix” in terms of Derrida’s idea of the matrix or “Khora” (p. 17) is, I believe, a bit misled, and Cohen himself ends...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 88–91.
Published: 01 January 2002
... with the past, the historical event, and consequently with the future. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/80 In considering the question of ideology, Cohen turns to two of the more prominent figures currently associated with the anachronistic “resurrection” of the term, Slavoj Zizek and Ernesto Laclau. Cohen’s...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (1): 91–93.
Published: 01 January 2002
... with the past, the historical event, and consequently with the future. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/80 In considering the question of ideology, Cohen turns to two of the more prominent figures currently associated with the anachronistic “resurrection” of the term, Slavoj Zizek and Ernesto Laclau. Cohen’s...