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Indian Anglophone novels

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (3): 273–288.
Published: 01 September 2022
... news, shape and produce what counts as knowledge in these Indian Anglophone novels. Both works evoke the failure of a poetics and politics of familial and extrafamilial relations to underline how death and the disappearance of women from families, from society, and from the news enable a comparison...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2019) 71 (4): 333–356.
Published: 01 December 2019
... context, the festival reinforced a national, linguistic, and religious division between India and Pakistan. It produced a category like “Moonlight’s Children” as an “other” to an imagined Indian literature that is confused with a post–Salman Rushdie postcolonial and global anglophone canon. However...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (2): 247–263.
Published: 01 June 2022
..., this essay reveals how an elongated temporal frame that accounts from non-European vantages—even in contemporary Anglophone literature—reorients not only what we consider the past and present of Indian Ocean worlds, but also how those pasts bear on the contemporary. Works Cited Amrith Sunil...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2024) 76 (1): 20–43.
Published: 01 March 2024
..., his 2020 One Arranged Murder Indianizes the Agatha Christie novel with a Punjabi wedding plot). His demotic English can then travel between vernacular Indian and Anglophone Indian spaces—as in the circuit from the English novel Five Point Someone to the Hindi film 3 Idiots , or Nikhil Sachan’s...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (4): 466–486.
Published: 01 December 2018
... of Indian origin in both areas. Narayanan links the growth of “authentic” audiences to protections for indigenous publishing industries between the 1970s and 1990 that put more Indians in curatorial roles in the top tiers of Indian publishing and so helped both Anglophone and vernacular South Asian writers...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2013) 65 (1): 15–25.
Published: 01 March 2013
... fully understand The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao  without situating it in more than one literary system? It belongs to the tradition of ethnic American literature, but it is also equally indebted to Latin American dicta- tor novels written in Spanish, not to mention Japanese manga and Indian...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 352–353.
Published: 01 September 2005
... “Emergence of Language and Literature,” with a chapter on “Language Use in West Indian Literature” by Maureen Warner-Lewis. Next, there is the section “Popular and Literate Cultures,” with a chapter on “The Institution of Literature” by Helen Tiffin. Finally, the section “Islands and Territories...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 354–355.
Published: 01 September 2005
... “Emergence of Language and Literature,” with a chapter on “Language Use in West Indian Literature” by Maureen Warner-Lewis. Next, there is the section “Popular and Literate Cultures,” with a chapter on “The Institution of Literature” by Helen Tiffin. Finally, the section “Islands and Territories...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 356–358.
Published: 01 September 2005
... (then at Yale University, now at Vanderbilt), who edited the Anglophone section. Within this sub- part we find the section “Emergence of Language and Literature,” with a chapter on “Language Use in West Indian Literature” by Maureen Warner-Lewis. Next, there is the section “Popular and Literate Cultures...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 359–361.
Published: 01 September 2005
... “Emergence of Language and Literature,” with a chapter on “Language Use in West Indian Literature” by Maureen Warner-Lewis. Next, there is the section “Popular and Literate Cultures,” with a chapter on “The Institution of Literature” by Helen Tiffin. Finally, the section “Islands and Territories...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2005) 57 (4): 362–364.
Published: 01 September 2005
... (then at Yale University, now at Vanderbilt), who edited the Anglophone section. Within this sub- part we find the section “Emergence of Language and Literature,” with a chapter on “Language Use in West Indian Literature” by Maureen Warner-Lewis. Next, there is the section “Popular and Literate Cultures...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 448–451.
Published: 01 December 2011
... creolization of themselves” (180). Arguably the book’s greatest strength is Ramazani’s deep familiarity with the var- ied poetic landscapes of Britain and its numerous former colonies on the Indian sub- continent, in Africa, and throughout the Caribbean, a familiarity which lends weight to his attempt...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 452–454.
Published: 01 December 2011
... former colonies on the Indian sub- continent, in Africa, and throughout the Caribbean, a familiarity which lends weight to his attempt to theorize a globalized approach to modern and contemporary poetry in English. However, despite a genuine effort, A Transnational Poetics displays comparatively...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2011) 63 (4): 454–456.
Published: 01 December 2011
... former colonies on the Indian sub- continent, in Africa, and throughout the Caribbean, a familiarity which lends weight to his attempt to theorize a globalized approach to modern and contemporary poetry in English. However, despite a genuine effort, A Transnational Poetics displays comparatively...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 141–143.
Published: 01 March 2022
... that English came to mediate Tagore’s engagements with Indian nationalism (through his debate with Gandhi), and through the cultivation of pan-Asian print networks that functionally seek to exclude the West. Chapter 2 addresses the development of Gandhi’s concept of nonviolent resistance in the Sanskrit...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2018) 70 (2): 145–159.
Published: 01 June 2018
...Madhumita Lahiri Abstract Whereas most modern South Asian vernacular literatures emerged in concert with nationalism, Tagore moved Bengali literature to its contemporary colloquial form even as he became ever more critical of Indian nationalism. This essay follows Tagore’s anti-nationalist and pan...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (2): 147–155.
Published: 01 June 2022
... 202 ). Curiously enough, nearly all the celebratory remarks in the aftermath of the announcement of the prize profiled Gurnah as an Anglophone postcolonial writer, while completely sidelining the fact that he has in fact been one of the most prominent narrators of the Indian Ocean (through a Joycean...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 25–51.
Published: 01 March 2022
... appropriators of Hafiz’s literary oeuvre. Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah, for instance, directly translated Hafiz’s entire dīvān into the Indian vernacular now understood as Urdu, while some of Wali’s couplets from his dīvān (published in 1700) are direct responses to Hafiz. 9 grewals42@macewan.ca...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2002) 54 (4): 291–306.
Published: 01 September 2002
.... Indian COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/292 alcedo which is a kind of unicorn, many Turkish and other foreign shoes and boots, a sea-parrot, a toad-fish, an elk’s hoof with three claws . . . a human bone weighing 42 lbs, Indian arrows such as are used by executioners in the West Indies—when a man...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (2): 186–201.
Published: 01 June 2022
...Kritish Rajbhandari Abstract This article explores the representation of multilingual Indian Ocean pasts in novels by Amitav Ghosh and Abdulrazak Gurnah, two key contemporary postcolonial writers from the opposite shores of the ocean. It theorizes the historical impulse in the novels as anarchival...