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Catalonia

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Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (1): 99–118.
Published: 01 March 2022
...Jerry White Abstract This article posits that Pier Paolo Pasolini’s long engagement with Catalonia offers important insights into his practice as a poet, filmmaker, and thinker about language, as well as explaining the nature of his influence on other European cinemas. The first part of the article...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (1): 96–106.
Published: 01 January 2008
.... But it seems quite clear that the Enlightenment had been marked by a call from a number of Catalan intellectuals to abandon their language in favor of Castilian, even though in the eighteenth century most of the population of Catalonia knew rather poorly if at all the language of Castile ( Juárez Medina 42...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (1): 74–80.
Published: 01 January 2008
... says that he believes he knows who they are. It is as if Mar- guerite wanted to prevent readers from assuming that the tale is mere fiction. The story is set in Aragon and Catalonia. Amadour, a handsome young noble- man attached to the viceroy of Catalonia, falls in love with Floride, the daughter...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2008) 60 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 January 2008
... rhetoric converts his exchanges with the girl into speech acts that are in their own way no less violent than the physical act of rape itself. The story is set in Aragon and Catalonia, where Amadour conspires through mar- riage and other machinations to remain in the entourage of Floride and gain...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 189–191.
Published: 01 March 2010
... and œuvre. Weinrich explains the shift in meaning from “times” to “temples” by the fact that in a large region that extended from northern Italy, through southern France, and into Catalonia the temples were also indi- cated by a form like Catalan pols, which derives from Latin pulsus and originally...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 191–193.
Published: 01 March 2010
... and œuvre. Weinrich explains the shift in meaning from “times” to “temples” by the fact that in a large region that extended from northern Italy, through southern France, and into Catalonia the temples were also indi- cated by a form like Catalan pols, which derives from Latin pulsus and originally...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2010
... and œuvre. Weinrich explains the shift in meaning from “times” to “temples” by the fact that in a large region that extended from northern Italy, through southern France, and into Catalonia the temples were also indi- cated by a form like Catalan pols, which derives from Latin pulsus and originally...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 195–197.
Published: 01 March 2010
... and œuvre. Weinrich explains the shift in meaning from “times” to “temples” by the fact that in a large region that extended from northern Italy, through southern France, and into Catalonia the temples were also indi- cated by a form like Catalan pols, which derives from Latin pulsus and originally...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2010) 62 (2): 197–199.
Published: 01 March 2010
... and œuvre. Weinrich explains the shift in meaning from “times” to “temples” by the fact that in a large region that extended from northern Italy, through southern France, and into Catalonia the temples were also indi- cated by a form like Catalan pols, which derives from Latin pulsus and originally...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2006) 58 (4): 271–292.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Provençal (Tiraboschi, “Introduzione” 10-11); the Arab conquest of al-Andalus and Sicily offers a plausible explanation for the spread of Arab rhyme in Europe (11-12); Provence, bordering with Catalonia, must have learned rhyme from there (17), and so on. Not dissimilar is Arteaga’s reply, pub- lished...
Journal Article
Comparative Literature (2022) 74 (4): 471–497.
Published: 01 December 2022
..., as names that remain ubiquitous in Cuba, such as the Catalan surname Bacardí (rum) and Partagás (tobacco, cigars) testify. “Havaneres,” still popular in Catalonia, are songs that describe the nostalgia of Catalans for Cuba. For further information on the history of Catalan presence in Cuba, see Joan M...