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slave culture

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Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2015) 21 (1): 19–43.
Published: 01 January 2015
... the slave the object of cultic worship by both masters and slaves. © 2014 by Duke University Press 2014 slavery slave revolt ancient Greece slave culture hero cult conflict resolution Symposium: Peace by Other Means, Part 2 SLAVES, STORIES, AND CULTS...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2005) 11 (2): 264–282.
Published: 01 April 2005
... cultural labor. agri- in enslaved ofthe use the and trade slave the both maintaining to justify without its overseas territories—was used at the turn ofof the the nineteenth eighteenth century century—that Portugal was vulnerable and economically weak...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2006) 12 (1): 107–116.
Published: 01 January 2006
...: of Ötüken,” as a Turk advised in the famous Orkhon inscriptions (c. inscriptions Orkhon famous aTurkthe as in of Ötüken,” advised tofi only culture, Chinese by transformed being without power of China and wealth onthe hands of howtheir tolay circle the tosquare tried they again...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (1): 80–101.
Published: 01 January 2002
... culture has been dis- enfranchised and devalued: reduced to the status of a set of objects collectible by the museums of euro-tribes, in whose further history these objects then come to “live.”4 Robbed of self-consciousness, the slave exists as an existential void for the master. The eyes...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2012) 18 (3): 538–540.
Published: 01 August 2012
... viewed the arrival of missionaries, who introduced their bibles and formulated scripts for vernacular tongues, as a restoration of cultural prop- erty that had been abandoned for good reason in the past. Not military rebel- lion but rather flight was their “basis...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2010) 16 (1): 31–47.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Harper’s Ferry, arm local slaves, and retreat to the mountains with an antislavery in armory federal the capture toit was hesome to haddescribed as supporters, twenty-one men in a brazen attack on Harper’s Ferry, His Virginia. plan, at least 16 October on and South, ofthe invasion...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2005) 11 (2): 249–263.
Published: 01 April 2005
... the and sewer.showcase forthe As imperial Americas—an the in port slaving biggest the seat and of empire the both was Rio city: asingle into trated concen- empires, all in found contradictions the faced court the There capital. roleimperial ofthe an assumed deJaneiro, Rio town slave...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2013) 19 (3): 518–529.
Published: 01 August 2013
... America has remained unstable. A central question underlying the history of race in the United States is how people could acknowledge the incoherence of racial categories while still structuring their lives, communities, politics, and culture around the idea of race. At a fundamental level, race has...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2008) 14 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2008
... to Rochester to study with her husband. I had read virtually everything by Gene and sought his mentorship. After reading Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made (1974), I believed him to be the most brilliant historian in the academy. I marveled at his skills of conceptualization, his complex think...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2015) 21 (3): 528.
Published: 01 September 2015
...David Konstan Dasen Véronique and Späth Thomas , eds., Children, Memory, and Family Identity in Roman Culture . ( Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2010 ), 373 pp. © 2015 by Duke University Press 2015...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2015) 21 (3): 528–529.
Published: 01 September 2015
...”) the role), and slaves born and raised in the household vernae (called the in raised role), and the born slaves and fill could mothers even (uncles, inevitable often acceptableand was parenting but surrogate appropriate values, the to offspring their for socializing responsible were...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 156–157.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 157–158.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 158–159.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 160.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 161.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 161.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 162.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 162–163.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (1): 163.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., in the new computer interface, depends upon what Manovich calls “cultural transcoding” (principle #5): it “follows the established convention of the computer’s organization of data”—for example, lists, records, and arrays. In this sense...