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Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 51–64.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Ardis Butterfield This article on fuzziness in medieval language use is the second part of a three-part contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur.” Each part corresponds broadly to Clifford Geertz's trifold instances of blur as involving “face-to-face...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 255–266.
Published: 01 April 2012
... “blurred genres” is used to think through the fuzzy properties of this period's bilingualism and to argue that to understand the boundaries between English and French as blurred is revealing of the linguistic and social tensions that were the product of conflict between two closely intertwined cultures...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 446–473.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Ardis Butterfield This is the final part of a three-part essay on fuzziness in medieval literary language. Each part corresponds broadly to Clifford Geertz's trifold instances of blur as involving “face-to-face interaction” (“life as game”), “collective intensities” (“life as stage”), and...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 65–87.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Richard Shiff This article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” documents how some modern artists and critics have argued against any sort of verbal thinking about art. Beyond describing works of visual art and pronouncing on their relative...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 229–238.
Published: 01 April 2012
... eventually coming to regard themselves as stressing different aspects of one and the same thing. © 2012 by Duke University Press 2012 Symposium: Fuzzy Studies, Part 2 FUZZY REASONING Ermanno Bencivenga Eubulides of Miletus, of the Megarian school...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 239–248.
Published: 01 April 2012
...Peter Burke This article is concerned with history that is fuzzy in the sense of impressionistic rather than systematic, using “soft” rather than “hard” data and concerned more with “lumping” than with “splitting.” It argues that there have been at least four phases in the two centuries of conflict...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2012) 18 (3): 487–504.
Published: 01 August 2012
... acknowledging complexity. © 2012 by Duke University Press 2012 Symposium: Fuzzy Studies, Part 3 “BYZANTINE” ART IN POST-­BYZANTINE SOUTH ITALY? Notes on A Fuzzy Concept Linda Safran Two decades ago I wrote a scholarly monograph on a church at the...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2013) 19 (2): 269–274.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Bruce B. Lawrence Few modern artists so consistently embodied a fuzzy logic of their own as did the Indian painter Maqbool Fida Husain (1915 – 2011). His critics tried to define him as a reckless defamer of Hindu values, but another way to define him is as a dutiful devotee of a vision that was...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 474–489.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Gerard Wiegers This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” argues, on the basis of recent research, that religious polemic is a phenomenon closely associated only with monotheist traditions. Focusing on religious polemics in medieval and early modern Islamic and Christian...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 506–517.
Published: 01 August 2013
... Press 2013 Symposium: Fuzzy Studies, Part 6 FUZZY PLURALISM The Case of Buddhism and Islam Johan Elverskog Everyone knows that the writing of history reflects the present, but theoretical writing — the “view from nowhere in...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2014) 20 (3): 511–517.
Published: 01 August 2014
...J. G. A. Pocock In this essay, the author both reviews Scott Sowerby's book Making Toleration: The Repealers and the Glorious Revolution (2013) and makes a late contribution to, or comment on, the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” (2011 – 13). Sowerby opposes the “Whig interpretation” that...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2011) 17 (3): 441–449.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Jeffrey M. Perl; Natalie Zemon Davis; Barry Allen In this introduction to Part 1 of the Common Knowledge symposium, “Fuzzy Studies,” the journal's editor discusses four essays from the 1980s by Richard Rorty, in which Rorty chose to associate himself with various neopragmatists, Continental...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 249–254.
Published: 01 April 2012
..., current when Christianity was the default position of religious discourse, and now largely obsolete. It is best to retain the word pagan but to concede that it is merely a pis aller . © 2012 by Duke University Press 2012 Symposium: Fuzzy Studies, Part 2 THE...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 424–445.
Published: 01 August 2013
... of the present, future, and past. In this sense, reticence is allied to conceptions of fuzziness and blur that have also been concerns of this journal in recent years. In making these claims, the essay relates Bakhtin's thought to a Russian literary tradition of thinking about silence (Tiutchev's and...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 490–505.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Andrew J. Nicholson This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” explores the boundaries between religions by exploring the ambiguous place of yoga in various religious traditions, both modern and premodern. Recently, certain Hindus and Christians have tried to argue that...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 40–50.
Published: 01 January 2013
...David S. Katz This contribution to part 4 of the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur” shows how the reputedly radical position that history is not about eternal truths but about the creative construction of a convincing narrative of past events is not an argument...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 88–95.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Karen Pinkus In this contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” the words ambiguity, ambivalence , and ambience are shown to share the common prefix, from Latin, ambi -, defined in most modern dictionaries as “around, on both sides.” Ambi captures...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 411–423.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Jeffrey M. Perl This essay, by the editor of Common Knowledge , introduces the sixth and final installment of “Fuzzy Studies,” the journal's “Symposium on the Consequence of Blur.” Suggesting that “Fuzzy Studies” should be understood in the context of a desultory campaign against zeal conducted in...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2013) 19 (2): 237–256.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Carolyn Richardson This article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies,” criticizes a prominent form of philosophical account of rational activity. Rational activity includes actions as varied as kicking a soccer ball and speaking a language. The philosophical accounts...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2013) 19 (2): 257–268.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Alan D. M. Rayner This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” argues that the inclusion of space in form brings varying degrees of fuzziness and fluidity to all natural identities. Such inclusion is vital to evolutionary creativity, from subatomic to cosmic scales of natural...