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Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 220–228.
Published: 01 April 2012
...Martin Jay; Ermanno Bencivenga; Peter Burke; Christopher P. Jones; Ardis Butterfield; Mercedes García-Arenal; Avinoam Rosenak; Francis X. Clooney, SJ Ever since Clifford Geertz urged the “blurring of genres” in the social sciences, many scholars have considered the crossing of disciplinary...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 411–423.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Jeffrey M. Perl This essay, by the editor of Common Knowledge , introduces the sixth and final installment of “Fuzzy Studies,” the journal's “Symposium on the Consequence of Blur.” Suggesting that “Fuzzy Studies” should be understood in the context of a desultory campaign against zeal conducted in...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 530–550.
Published: 01 August 2013
... corrosive reaction against existing and potential identities, parameters, distinctions, foci, and logics. © 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 Symposium: Fuzzy Studies, Part 6 CENTRAL EUROPE — BETWEEN PRESENCE AND ABSENCE The Architectonics of Blur in Loos...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2011) 17 (3): 441–449.
Published: 01 August 2011
..., and fallibilist.” He defined the “new fuzziness” as “an attempt to blur just those distinctions between the objective and subjective and between fact and value which the critical conception of rationality has developed.” This introduction also examines W. V. Quine's essay “Speaking of Objects” (1957...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2011) 17 (3): 450–532.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Barry Allen In this monograph-length article, which inaugurates a multipart symposium titled “Fuzzy Studies,” the significance and virtues of blur are investigated through the whole history of Chinese intellectual tradition. In the Western tradition, the blur of becoming seems to disqualify an...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2012) 18 (3): 419–432.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Jeffrey M. Perl In this introduction to part three of the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” the journal’s editor argues that blur is not a medium of concealment, confusion, or evasion. Making distinctions between kinds of relative unclarity (for instance, haze...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 255–266.
Published: 01 April 2012
... “blurred genres” is used to think through the fuzzy properties of this period's bilingualism and to argue that to understand the boundaries between English and French as blurred is revealing of the linguistic and social tensions that were the product of conflict between two closely intertwined cultures...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 518–529.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Daniel J. Sharfstein Beginning with the assumption that race is a conceptual blur, this contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” argues that race conflates what is plain to see with something that is invisible. Race roots today's policy decisions in a remote and often imagined...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 40–50.
Published: 01 January 2013
...David S. Katz This contribution to part 4 of the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur” shows how the reputedly radical position that history is not about eternal truths but about the creative construction of a convincing narrative of past events is not an argument...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 51–64.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Ardis Butterfield This article on fuzziness in medieval language use is the second part of a three-part contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur.” Each part corresponds broadly to Clifford Geertz's trifold instances of blur as involving “face-to-face...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2012) 18 (2): 267–291.
Published: 01 April 2012
...Mercedes García-Arenal This contribution to a symposium “on the consequence of blur” deals with the case of Agustín de Ribera and his followers in sixteenth-century Castile. Inquisition trial records report the appearance, around 1535 among the Moriscos (Catholic converts of Muslim origin) in...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 28–39.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Robin Wagner-Pacifici This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur” is the introduction to its fourth installment. The piece elaborates a new approach, termed “political semiosis,” to tracking event emergence, event formation, and event deformation...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 65–87.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Richard Shiff This article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” documents how some modern artists and critics have argued against any sort of verbal thinking about art. Beyond describing works of visual art and pronouncing on their relative...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 88–95.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Karen Pinkus In this contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” the words ambiguity, ambivalence , and ambience are shown to share the common prefix, from Latin, ambi -, defined in most modern dictionaries as “around, on both sides.” Ambi captures...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 96–110.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Michael D. Jackson This memoiristic essay is a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium titled “Fuzzy Studies: On the consequence of blur.” While probing his personal memories and making a case for devaluing our intellectual constructs, the author, an anthropologist, examines paintings by...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 January 2013) 19 (1): 111–130.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Brook Ziporyn The article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” analyzes the metaphysical assumptions behind the valorization of “clear and distinct ideas,” apodictic knowledge, and definitiveness, and it suggests alternatives derived from...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2012) 18 (3): 464–486.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Morten Axel Pedersen; Rane Willerslev As part of a Common Knowledge symposium on the “consequence of blur,” this article reassesses the anthropologist E. B. Tylor’s famous but vague concept of the animist soul as an optimal reflection of the soul’s fuzzy ontological status among animist peoples...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 April 2013) 19 (2): 217–223.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Mikhail Epstein; Jeffrey M. Perl This essay, coauthored by the editor and a member of the editorial board of Common Knowledge , introduces the fifth installment of the journal's symposium “Fuzzy Studies,” which is about the “consequence of blur.” Beginning with a review of Enlightenment ideas about...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 424–445.
Published: 01 August 2013
... of the present, future, and past. In this sense, reticence is allied to conceptions of fuzziness and blur that have also been concerns of this journal in recent years. In making these claims, the essay relates Bakhtin's thought to a Russian literary tradition of thinking about silence (Tiutchev's and...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (1 August 2013) 19 (3): 446–473.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Ardis Butterfield This is the final part of a three-part essay on fuzziness in medieval literary language. Each part corresponds broadly to Clifford Geertz's trifold instances of blur as involving “face-to-face interaction” (“life as game”), “collective intensities” (“life as stage”), and...