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aeschylus

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Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2015) 21 (2): 253–269.
Published: 01 April 2015
...Edith Hall The earliest ancient Greek text to narrate the resolution of a large-scale conflict by judicial means is Aeschylus's tragedy Eumenides , first performed in Athens in 458 BC. After explaining the historical context in which the play was performed—a context of acute civic discord...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2017) 23 (1): 105–106.
Published: 01 January 2017
... the borrowed have could [Shakespeare] Aeschylus: “thundering” knew certainly and texts Classical of library afine had who Jonson, with then working was speare and Oresteia the between noted been have that similarities obvious the for better account surely would patterns...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2016) 22 (2): 277–283.
Published: 01 May 2016
... —  Aeschylus evidently regarded the warrior’s homecoming in the Odyssey the in homecoming warrior’s the regarded evidently Aeschylus...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2017) 23 (2): 374–376.
Published: 01 April 2017
... . He is currently writing a book on Aeschylus’s Oresteia. Aeschylus’s on abook writing currently .He...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2021) 27 (3): 496–499.
Published: 01 August 2021
...Alissa Valles Epigraphs are from Aeschylus: Fragments , Loeb Classical Library 505, ed. and trans. Alan H. Sommerstein (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009). and one of the amber tears that you dig up in a thousand years may hold in it, not grief, but a seed from which...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2016) 22 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 January 2016
... violence is virtuous, in the eyes of the perpetrator.” Steven Pinker, in his celebrity foreword, describes this thesis as “contrarian” and “radical,” though it was already a commonplace when Aeschylus wrote the Oresteia. “We were right” is Agamemnon’s verdict...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 352.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 352–353.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 353.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 353–354.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 341.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 341–342.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 343.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 343.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 344.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 344.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 345.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 346.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 346.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (2): 347.
Published: 01 April 2003
... himself for having brought “everyday life” (oikeia pragmata) into the theater by portraying women as well as men. But Aeschylus vilifies his opponent for staging only women like Phaedra and Sthenoboia, driven to destroy themselves and those...