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Puritan ethics

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Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2015) 21 (1): 141–171.
Published: 01 January 2015
... by formulating them in terms of the “right” rather than the “good.” Further, the essay shows how the German word Pflicht , central to Kant's ethics, does not correspond in meaning to the English word duty , whose cultural roots lie in English Puritanism. More generally, the argument is that, ultimately, “common...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2022) 28 (1): 151.
Published: 01 January 2022
... workaholics is all too familiar to anyone who was forced to read Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter in high school or Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism in college. And younger folk who are now encountering Puritans through the New York Times 's “1619 Project” or any...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2010) 16 (2): 247–275.
Published: 01 April 2010
... in transgresses the tosacred confirm (life), acts (ethically) in favor of sustaining life (ethically), she transgresses (unethically). English and by other Indians. Even those Puritans as supportive of as and English Evensupportive by them as other Dan Indians. Puritans those the by both mistrusted...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2009) 15 (1): 39–58.
Published: 01 January 2009
... By contrast, a progressive politics that understands quietism only as the the as only quietism understands that politics progressive a contrast, By Puritans and Predestination:and Puritans 1982 –  (Chapel 1695(Chapel ), viii...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2007) 13 (2-3): 497–511.
Published: 01 August 2007
... and the for mythical a became thus Crusoe predecessors, three his than more regards “business enterprise as the appropriate field of Christian endeavor.” WeberEven teaches, Max as ethic, Puritan the and self-evident; is Crusoe of alism...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2023) 29 (3): 342–366.
Published: 01 September 2023
... state, and he was a victim of that civil corruption as much as of the attempt to control his religious conscience. 18 One of those corruptions was the removal of his right to be heard. Here we can begin to examine roots of Lilburne's worldview beyond his Puritanism, for it is abundantly clear...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2003) 9 (3): 406–423.
Published: 01 August 2003
... tradition is com- State and Puritan Society” traces this lack of power in resources as this overwhelmed other human considera- Errand in the Wilderness (Cambridge: Harvard University tions; the intolerant attitudes...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (1): 152–177.
Published: 01 January 2002
...), 54–72. England, for example, Richard Hooker argued that the laws of the Church needed to be modified to respond to “alteration of time and place,” while King 157 James I, in controversy with the group it remains convenient to describe as the Puritans, declared that the law of Moses...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 415–416.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 416.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 417.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 417.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 418.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 418–419.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 419.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 420.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 420.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 421.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 421–422.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...
Journal Article
Common Knowledge (2002) 8 (2): 422.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., and blotches express “the unavailability of the image for representing the divine”? Finally, is it significant that it was in a country with a puritanical—that is, a Calvinist—and severely iconoclastic tradition that abstractionism gained the most influence and authority in the art world? Besançon argues...