According to A. Nony Mouse, the Batrachomyomachia in the Florentine edition of 1474 was “the first book printed entirely in Greek, fifteen years before the publication of the Princips Editio, the first complete printed edition of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey.” The original Greek—probably Hellenistic, though for centuries believed to be Homer's own—is in “the unrhymed dactylic hexameter of the Homeric epic” but concerns frogs and mice in combat, not Hector and Achilles. “This,” A. Nony Mouse deadpans, “was how the Renaissance conned its Homer.” It is unclear, though, that “the Renaissance”—whose existence is a confidence trick in its own right—conned its Homer in a more doubtful vein than any historical milieu or association before or since. Meanwhile, according to the putative translator of this “tiny Homeric epic”—Stallings, the professor of poetry at Oxford—the actual translator is A. Nony Mouse, who is also said to have written the enlightening...

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