Ian Hacking died in Toronto on May 10, 2023. Sadly, his health had been declining since his wife, the philosopher Judith Baker, died in 2014. He never recovered from that blow.

Ian left us a large body of beautifully written and highly influential work across an astonishing range of disciplines—probability theory and statistical inference, experimental physics, and the philosophy of mathematics, language, logic, classification, mental health, race, and poverty. When I was arguing with university administrators (I was one myself) who wanted to somehow legislate the breaking down of academic “silos,” I gave Ian as an example of the way to do it. He was a one-person interdisciplinary department, a phenomenon that cannot be engineered by higher-ups but is enabled by simply giving people freedom to roam. In his own memorial for Paul Feyerabend in this journal, Ian might well have been talking about himself when he remarked that “philosophers...

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