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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2013) 28 (1 (82)): 37–67.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Woolf's modernist “moment of being”; the performativity of gender and kinship (Judith Butler, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick); and theories of queer time and affect (Judith Halberstam, Elizabeth Freeman, Lauren Berlant). These readings probe The Hours 's return to mediated cultural ideals of white conjugal and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 248–252.
Published: 01 December 1989
... puzzling questions which we experience in everyday life without look- ing for them. I also think Virginia Woolf wasn’t speaking in metaphors when she wrote about food for thought in A Room of One’s Own. School of Cinema-Television...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2006) 21 (1 (61)): 105–145.
Published: 01 May 2006
..., Clarissa was positive, a particular hush, or solemnity; an indescribable pause; a suspense . . . before Big Ben strikes. There! Out it boomed. First a warning, musical; then the hour, irrevocable. —Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway As a motif throughout Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway, the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1990) 8 (3 (24)): 64–87.
Published: 01 September 1990
... deictic referring to a subject of consciousness. Where is such a sentence to “describe the world seen without a self,” as Virginia Woolf puts it,15 available? C’est toujours a l’imparfait de l’objectif Que tu conjugues le verbe...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 28–39.
Published: 01 December 1989
... Culturale Virginia Woolf, 1984 . Grignaffini , Giovanna . “La foto del sogno.” Lapis 1 (November 1987 ). Liehm , Mira . Passion and Defiance: Film in Italy from 1942 to the Present . Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984 . Magli , Patrizia . Corpo e linguaggio . Rome...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2009) 24 (3 (72)): 111–151.
Published: 01 December 2009
... have no country; as a woman, I want no country; as a woman my country is the whole world.  — Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas Here was the soup. It was a plain gravy soup. . . . One could have seen through the transparent liquid any pattern that there might have been on the plate itself...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 246–248.
Published: 01 December 1989
... we all do tacitly, but my main guides to research are the puzzling questions which we experience in everyday life without look- ing for them. I also think Virginia Woolf wasn’t speaking in metaphors when she wrote about food for thought in A Room of One’s Own...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2009) 24 (3 (72)): 153–162.
Published: 01 December 2009
... feature reminded me of Virginia Woolf ’s observation about women’s books that they “continue each other, in spite of our habit of judging them separately.”7 Reichardt greatly admires the French director’s work and particularly the autonomous conditions under which she produces her...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2005) 20 (2 (59)): 73–117.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1995) 12 (2 (35)): 186–221.
Published: 01 May 1995
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2003) 18 (3 (54)): 177–211.
Published: 01 December 2003
... identifying a female gaze or voice, I will discuss the ways in which Orlando and My Twentieth Century may “address the spectator as female” (132), and may thus result in—different—possibilities of female agency. Politics In the West, Sally Potter’s Orlando, the reworking of Virginia Woolf’s...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2014) 29 (1 (85)): 5–31.
Published: 01 May 2014
... director might add to a reading of her work’s circulation in the contemporary global terrain of film festivals and criticism. In a recent essay, Kathleen McHugh provides an instructive point of departure for considering women filmmakers and trans- national paradigms, drawing on Virginia Woolf’s...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2005) 20 (2 (59)): 119–163.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 235–241.
Published: 01 December 1989
... Woolf, older and angrier, ironically and insistently wrote in Three Guineas, because we are trained differently in mind and spirit than men, we see the same world, but we see it with different eyes. However, we still need an adjective: for me, a white spectatrix, the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 1–9.
Published: 01 May 2008
... “fusion of dandy and diva” that includes fig- ures like Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Una Troubridge, Noël Cow- ard, Marlene Dietrich, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Joan Jett, Andy Warhol, and fictional characters like Dorian Gray, Orlando (from 6  •  Camera Obscura Virginia Woolf’s novel), and Jack...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1993) 11 (1 (31)): 26–47.
Published: 01 May 1993
... in shaping the discourses around Upstairs, Downstairs because Galsworthy, unlike his modernist con- temporaries T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Virginia Woolf, held fast to the traditions of nineteenth-century realism and turned his back, so to speak, on the innovations of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2006) 21 (1 (61)): 1–25.
Published: 01 May 2006
... for us to state the simple fact; Orlando was a man till the age of thirty; when he became a woman and has remained so ever since.  — Virginia Woolf, Orlando Camera Obscura turns thirty in 2006. The editors eschewed, or neglected, marking twenty-five, a somewhat unformed age, in favor of the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1983) 4 (2 (11)): 132–145.
Published: 01 September 1983
... social criticism. Inspired by Goya's drawings and Virginia Woolfs novel, Ottinger introduces Orlando as a figure who can change sexes and live for centuries, and who partakes of all those human and social experiences otherwise only dreamed about by historical men and women. Orlando's journey...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2004) 19 (2 (56)): 1–45.
Published: 01 September 2004
... illumination of other people’s eyes, and therefore cannot be entirely sure what is my self.” —Bernard from Virginia Woolf’s The Waves In 1992–93, an exhibition titled Visualising Masculinities was featured at the Tate Gallery in London. The declared aim of the exhibition was to examine “the display...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2008) 23 (3 (69)): 35–79.
Published: 01 December 2008
... birth of artistic and literary modernism, a birth that made much of its attractions to so-called African imports. When Virginia Woolf made the unequivocal claim that “in or about December, 1910, human character changed,” she tied this sea change directly to Roger Fry’s enormously influential...